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A super time for Bradley interns

JOSH KOEBERT ’12, left, and ZACH KEESEE ’12 had a super time in Indianapolis the first week in February. 

The sports communication majors got a close-up view of the media frenzy around Super Bowl XLVI as interns for NBC/Universal, assisting NBC Sports with coverage of one of the biggest media attractions in the world. 

“We clipped articles, which means we searched the Web for items mentioning NBC, its coverage of the Super Bowl, or its on-air talent,” Keesee said, explaining that their reports were sent to NBC executives. 

“We dealt a little with talent coordination (getting the on-air personalities where they were supposed to be) and transcribing NBC Sports programming,” Koebert added. 

The internships were arranged by Dr. Paul Gullifor, chairman of the communication department. The students stayed with a local family and worked out of a hotel in downtown Indianapolis.  

Workdays stretched from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., with his Super Bowl Sunday shift lasting into the early morning, Koebert said. That left some time for seeing the sights, some of which were literally across the hall or around the corner. 

“One of the coolest parts was that the NFL Network had the room across the hall from us, so random players and celebrities were always in the hallway and popped in to our room occasionally,” Koebert said. He added that Radio Row, where shows from around the country originated that week, was also there and provided additional chances to see celebrities. 

Rubbing shoulders with people like commentators Dan Patrick and Mike Florio, coach-turned-broadcaster Tony Dungy, and top-ranking NBC Sports executives highlighted the pair’s weeklong stay. Plus, there were other memories. 

“As a Bears fan, I got my picture taken with Mike Ditka before work started one morning,” recalled Keesee, who interned for NASCAR at the Chicagoland Speedway Geico 400 last year and is one of 10 Bradley students who will intern for NBC at the 2012 London Olympics.  

Koebert and Keesee also said they thought the game’s final result was expected. 

“I had a feeling New York was going to pull it out all week,” Koebert said.

— Bob Grimson ’81; Photography by Duane Zehr