composting.jpg

Stepping up sustainability

In a continuing effort to help Bradley red “go green,” the University has made recent improvements with the environment in mind. Three electric vehicle charging stations were installed on campus in February. In addition, cafeterias and other food outlets on campus began collecting food scraps and food-soiled paper for composting last winter.  

Two charging stations are in the Main Street parking deck, and one is in the deck on Duryea. They are among the first public electric vehicle outlets in Peoria.

Each station features a universal standard connection and a screen with user-friendly instructions. With the swipe of a credit card, drivers are able to fully charge their vehicles. Charging costs 75 cents per hour, and users can specify the length of charging time when they plug in their vehicles. It takes an estimated three to four hours for a vehicle to receive a full charge. 

“As ownership of electric vehicles increases, there will be a growing need for such power stations. Bradley is looking to the future and will be prepared to serve the campus community’s needs,” said LeRoy Neilson, University facilities supervisor. 

From table to farm

Online

Visit bgreen.bradley.edu for more information about Bradley’s sustainability practices.

Twice a week, Midwest Fiber Recycling takes cafeteria waste to Illinois State University’s farm in Lexington, where ISU students and farm employees mix it with livestock manure and leaf and yard waste to create a fertilizer that can be purchased. Approximately 1,800 pounds of waste were sent weekly during the school year.

“Everyone benefits from composting,” said Gary Anna, Bradley’s vice president for business affairs. “Rather than filling up the landfills, we are putting the items back into the earth. Bradley recycled more than 25 tons of material during the first quarter of 2012, a University record.” 

According to Midwest Fiber Recycling, more than 30 percent of Illinois landfill waste is food scraps and food-soiled paper — 54,000 tons each year.

  — Abby Wilson Pfeiffer ’10

ICAT marks 25 years

Nearly 500 leaders from industry, academia, and governments worldwide converged April 3–4 in East Peoria for the 25th anniversary of ICAT (Innovations Conference on Asphalt and Transportation), sponsored by Bradley’s Center for Emerging Technologies in Infrastructure and the Department of Civil Engineering and Construction. Some of the dignitaries included, front row: Peoria Mayor Jim Ardis; Illinois Secretary of Transportation Ann Schneider; Bradley professor and conference chairman Dr. Amir Al-Khafaji; U.S. Secretary of Transportation RAY LaHOOD ’71 HON ’11; Rosie Andolino (Chicago commissioner of aviation); Kristi LaFleur (Illinois Tollway executive director); Pam Cullerton and John Cullerton (Illinois Senate president); JAMES KENNY ’76 (Kenny Construction vice president ); and Stephen Davis (WILL Group president). 

Back row: Sheshadri Guha (CGN & Associates president); Larry Ivory (National Black Chamber of Commerce chairman); State Sen. Darin LaHood; Larry Tate (Caterpillar Inc. global mining manager); State Sen. David Koehler; Sheik Saad Abu Risha (member of the national coalition that rules Iraq); and Michael Sutton (Infrastructure Engineering president).