Course Descriptions

ANT 101 - The Anthropological Perspective (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Introduction to field of cultural anthropology and its unique perspective for the study of human culture and societies. Examines modes of social organization and dimensions of culture worldwide. Students are introduced to the diversity of human cultures and to anthropological theories and methods through ethnographic examples drawn from a variety of non-Western cultures. Focuses on processes and institutions of enculturation, including linguistic, economic, kinship, religious, political, and aesthetic practices. Considers the processes of culture change and the effects of colonialism and globalization on these processes.

ANT 102 - Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3 hours)
Examines fundamental aspects of the physical nature of humans and human variability. Selectively reviews the long record of human biological adaptations that have existed from the appearance of the earliest hominids up to the development of anatomically modern forms. Topics include principles and mechanisms of evolution, human variation and adaptability, non-human primate behavior, human and nonhuman osteology (study of the skeleton), and the human fossil record.

ANT 303 - Culture & Belief: Magic, Witchcraft, Religion (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Introduces students to the anthropology of religion, examining the relationship between culture and belief in a cross-cultural perspective and exploring a variety of religious experiences from different cultures around the world, with an emphasis on small-scale and non-Western societies. The course also examines beliefs in magic, witchcraft, and sorcery; animism; ritual; possession and trance; the intersection of belief and healing; religious syncretism and the impact of colonialism on religious belief. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 101 or ANT 101.

ANT 305 - Peoples and Cultures of the Non-Western World (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Examines the culture and social organization of a specific "non-Western" region or cultural group. Specific topics will vary by semester and will be stated in the semester schedule of classes. Geographic foci will include, among others, Asia, Latin America, and indigenous Australia. Through the study of a particular culture or geographic region, students will be exposed to anthropological theories and methods and a deeper understanding of the processes and institutions of enculturation. The course will also emphasize the effects of colonialism and globalization on the processes of cultural change in the region of study. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 semester hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 101 or ANT 101.

ANT 306 - Illness and Healing in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours)
Introduces medical anthropology and the social aspects of health, illness, and healing in different cultures. Considers the interaction between traditional healing systems and biomedicine in developing nations and among transnational populations. Explores the cultural construction of illness, healing, and health through theoretical analysis and ethnographic case studies. Topics discussed include: ethnomedicine; medical pluralism; the intersections of religion, belief, and healing; gender, race, and ethnicity in relation to health and healing; inequalities in global health; birth, aging, and dying in cross-cultural context. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 101 or ANT 101.

ANT 314 - Native Americans (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Socio-historical analysis of the experience of Native Americans spanning the last 500 years. Focus on a variety of stereotypes and misconceptions regarding native Americans. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 101 or ANT 101; or consent of instructor.

ANT 402 - Ethnographic and Qualitative Methods (3 hours)
The purpose of this class is to learn what ethnographic and qualitative research is and how ethnographers and qualitative researchers work. Students will read and discuss a variety texts on methodological issues; read and critique ethnographic texts; and engage in qualitative research by designing a mini-research project, carrying it out, analyzing data, and writing it up. Topics covered include research questions and design, ethics and informed consent, ethnographic representation and responsibility, theoretical and practical concerns about fieldwork and participant observation, fieldnotes, interviews and life histories, processing and analyzing data, and writing up research results. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 101; and Anthropology minor or Sociology major

ANT 101 - The Anthropological Perspective (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW 
This course is an introduction to field of cultural anthropology and its unique perspective for the study of human culture and societies. The course examines modes of social organization and dimensions of culture worldwide. Students are introduced to the diversity of human cultures and to anthropological theories and methods through ethnographic examples drawn from a variety of non-Western cultures. The course focuses on processes and institutions of enculturation, including linguistic, economic, kinship, religious, political, and aesthetic practices. It also considers the processes of culture change and the effects of colonialism and globalization on these processes. 

ANT 102 – Physical Anthropology (3 hours)
This course examines fundamental aspects of the physical nature of humans and human variability. It selectively reviews the long record of human biological adaptations that have existed from the appearance of the earliest hominids up to the development of anatomically modern forms. Topics include principles and mechanisms of evolution, human variation and adaptability, non-human primate behavior, human and nonhuman osteology (study of the skeleton), and the human fossil record.

SOC 300 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives On Gender (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Examines the construction of gender in non-western societies, concentrating on the way gender shapes and is shaped by power relations in these societies. Prerequisite: SOC 100, SOC/ANT 101, or consent of instructor.

ANT 303 - Culture & Belief: Magic, Witchcraft, Religion (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
This course introduces students to the anthropology of religion, examining the relationship between culture and belief in a cross-cultural perspective and exploring a variety of religious experiences from different cultures around the world, with an emphasis on small-scale and non-Western societies. The course also examines beliefs in magic, witchcraft and sorcery; animism; ritual; possession and trance; the intersection of belief and healing; religious syncretism and the impact of colonialism on religious belief. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC/ANT 101.

ANT 305 - Peoples and Cultures of the Non-Western World (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
This course will examine the culture and social organization of a specific "non-Western" region or cultural group. Specific topics will vary by semester and will be stated in the semester schedule of classes. Geographic foci will include, among others, Asia, Latin America, and indigenous Australia. Through the study of a particular culture or geographic region, students will be exposed to anthropological theories and methods, and a deeper understanding of the processes and institutions of enculturation. The course will also emphasize the effects of colonialism and globalization on the processes of cultural change in the region of study. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 semester hours. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC/ANT 101.

ANT 306 – Illness and Healing in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3 hours)
This course in medical anthropology offers an introduction to the concepts and social aspects of health, illness and healing in different cultures with consideration of the interaction between “traditional” healing systems and biomedicine in developing nations and among transnational populations. The course explores the cultural construction of illness, healing and health through theoretical analysis and ethnographic case studies. Topics discussed include: ethnomedicine; medical pluralism; the intersections of religion, belief and healing; gender, race and ethnicity in relation to health and healing; inequalities in global health; birth, aging and dying in cross-cultural context.  Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC/ANT 101.

SOC 311 - Comparative Family Systems (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Comparative study of non-Western family systems, with a focus on cross-cultural differences and the potential conflicts of migration. Varying focus on families of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Prerequisite: SOC 100, SOC/ANT 101, or consent of instructor.

ANT 314 – Native Americans (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
This course focuses on the cultures of native peoples of the Americas.  Primary emphasis is on the United States, with some comparative discussion of Meso-America and South America.  While the course presents historical background for native American peoples (from the initial peopling of the continents through the rise of pre-Columbian civilizations) and their colonial encounters (from the initial European invasions to the present), the primary emphasis is on contemporary native cultures and issues facing indigenous peoples in the Americas. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC/ANT 101.

ANT 402 – Ethnographic and Qualitative Methods  (3 hours)
The purpose of this class is to learn what ethnographic and qualitative research is and how ethnographers and qualitative researchers work.  Students will read and discuss a variety texts on methodological issues; read and critique ethnographic texts; and engage in qualitative research by designing a mini-research project, carrying it out, analyzing data, and writing it up.  Topics covered include research questions and design, ethics and informed consent, ethnographic representation and responsibility, theoretical and practical concerns about fieldwork and participant observation, fieldnotes, interviews and life histories, processing and analyzing data, and writing up.  Prerequisite:  SOC/ANT 101 and Anthropology minor or Sociology major; or consent of instructor.