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Electrical Engineering

The electrical engineering program, including the computer option, consists of several curricular components that give the student the opportunity to build a solid foundation of basic physical principles and obtain experience in design as well as insight into the profession and practice of electrical engineering. The lecture sequence consists mostly of required core courses through which the student learns about and acquires problem-solving and/or design skills in circuit analysis, digital design, programming in a high-level language, electronics, microcontrollers, signals and systems, and electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, through elective courses, the student can specialize in areas such as applied electromagnetics, communications, controls, digital signal processing, digital and computer systems, electromechanical systems, embedded systems, mechatronics, robotics, and wireless components and systems. For a student in the computer option, the electives must be in the digital area (see computer option in Programs of Study section.)

In the freshman year, students are exposed to the “Intro to EE” sequence consisting of four courses: an introductory circuit theory course (ECE 101), digital logic analysis and design with programmable devices (ECE 102), computer programming (ECE 103), and freshman laboratory (ECE 120). This sequence exposes students early in the academic program to both hardware and software design, and implementation of basic circuits and systems in the laboratory.

Students will be exposed to all of the primary areas of electrical and computer engineering before the junior year. This includes high-level software, low-level microcontroller software, analog and digital circuits, electromagnetics, computation and simulation, and system theory. This exposure will aid students in their selection of CORE courses in the junior year (ECE 431 Communication Theory I, ECE 440 Electromechanical Systems, ECE 441 Control System Theory I, ECE 451 Radio Frequency Circuits and Systems, ECE 470 Data-Structures and Object-oriented Programming, ECE 480 Digital Systems: Communication and Interface, ECE 481: Digital Systems: Design and Synthesis).

Though many design techniques are taught in the lecture courses, the student learns the practice of electrical engineering design primarily through the laboratory and project sequence. In addition, each year contains at least one design project experience. The lab courses integrate material from the lecture courses and are taught by experienced faculty members. In addition, small numbers of students allow for close interaction with the instructor. Furthermore, the laboratory facilities and equipment are modern and readily accessible. Many of the lecture courses and all of the lab courses require the use of computers as well as the oral and/or written presentation of technical material.

Several aspects of design are taught in the freshman, sophomore, and junior labs (ECE 120, ECE 221, and ECE 322). The student’s design experience in these courses includes synthesis to meet specifications, analysis, construction, testing, and evaluation with respect to specifications. Furthermore, the freshman, sophomore, and junior design projects associated with these courses are particularly valuable and establish the foundation of the design project sequence. In addition to the implementation steps described above, the projects also require formulation of design problem statements and criteria, consideration of alternative solutions, and system descriptions.

The design project sequence culminates with the capstone project. The students start preliminary design work on the capstone project during the spring semester of the junior year in ECE 497. The primary deliverables for the capstone project are:

  • choose a capstone project and an ECE faculty advisor,
  • develop a detailed functional description and block diagram of the project,
  • determine the functional requirements of the project and list its quantitative performance specifications,
  • identify and evaluate the patents and standards applicable to the project,
  • present a proposal presenting a design and implementation plan for the project, and
  • establish a web page for the project.

In addition to the effort on the capstone project, the seniors work in teams to review and analyze the deliverables for other senior projects. Lab work associated with the capstone project starts in the fall semester of the senior year in ECE 498 and is completed in ECE 499 in the following semester.

The capstone project is a major educational component of the program. It involves the student in design at or near the professional level and requires the formulation of design specifications, consideration of alternative solutions, feasibility considerations, time management, allocation of design responsibilities, and detailed system documentation. Project advising is done on a distributed basis with the student choosing his/her project advisor from the members of the ECE faculty.

The student builds on this capstone project experience in ECE 401 and ECE 402 (Undergraduate Design Seminar I and II) during the fall and spring semesters of the senior year. In these courses, the student works on a multidisciplinary team to prepare a business plan delineating the development of a venture based on an electronic product. The student also explores other aspects of engineering and, through the process, gains a broader view of the engineering profession.

The electrical engineering program, including the computer option, also requires the student to complete a 12-hour professional elective stem. This stem allows the student to take a coherent set of courses so as to enhance the student’s competitiveness in the job market or better prepare for graduate or professional school. For example, the student can use the professional electives to obtain business skills by taking courses offered by the Foster College of Business. Also, no more than 6 hours of ECE courses can be applied toward the 12 hours of the professional elective stem. Additional information is available in an advising handout. The student must work with an academic advisor to identify the courses he/she will use to satisfy the professional elective stem and fill out the Professional Elective Approval Form. This form must be signed by the ECE Chairman and the courses approved to fill the professional elective stem constitute a requirement for the BSEE degree for the student.

In addition to the technical part of the program described above, the student must also meet the University General Education requirements (see “Academic Regulations” in this catalog.) As part of the General Education requirement, the student gains effective communication skills via introductory and advanced English composition and a speech course. The General Education requirements also provide the foundation for a liberal education, which helps the student understand and participate in society as a responsible human being. Courses include Western Civilization (CIV 100, CIV 101, or CIV 102), Introduction to Economics (ECO 100), as well as selections from non-western civilization, social forces, human values, and fine arts. For these last four categories, the student chooses from a list of approved courses.

A wide range of career opportunities are available to the electrical engineering graduate in many different technical areas and industries. For those who wish to continue their professional studies, details of the MSEE program are given in the Bradley University Graduate Catalog.

Professional and Personal Growth

The electrical engineering lecture courses and lab/project sequence prepare students very well for success as design engineers in the electrical and computer engineering profession. The ECE faculty also urges students to participate in activities and take courses that promote professional growth. It is strongly recommended that students join the Bradley Student Branch of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology and promotes professional development through various activities. In addition, students are advised to consider experiential education such as the co-op program. Finally, students can choose their general education courses and professional electives to put a distinctive stamp on their programs of study. For example, they can seek a minor appropriate to career goals or participate in a study abroad program. (Note that certain minors and study abroad program will add hours and/or time to the normal eight-semester, 130-hour program of study.)

In addition to professional development, students are urged to participate in a variety of activities and organizations to enhance personal growth. Employers like individuals who are well rounded and can effectively interact with different interest groups of people. Bradley offers a wide range of experiences and, in the past, electrical engineering students have participated in many activities and organization such as intramurals, service groups, sport clubs, study abroad, theater, tutoring, various Bradley musical groups, and volunteer activities. A complete list of registered student organizations is available in this catalog in the Student Activities section.

Program of Study: Electrical Engineering 

Credit in the following courses must be obtained to meet degree requirements in electrical engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering.

Freshman Year
First Semester

  • ECE 101 Intro to EE: DC Circuits - 2 hrs.
  • ECE 102 Intro to EE: Digital Systems - 3 hrs.
  • MTH 121 Calculus I - 4 hrs.
  • CHM 110 General Chemistry I - 3 hrs.
  • CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab - 1 hr.
  • ENG 101 English Composition or COM 103 Oral Communications Process - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Second Semester

  • ECE 103 Intro to EE: Computers and Programming - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 120 Intro to EE: Circuits and Digital Systems Laboratory - 2 hrs.
  • MTH 122 Calculus II - 4 hrs.
  • PHY 110 University Physics I - 4 hrs.
  • ENG 101 English Composition or 103 Oral Communications Process - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Sophomore Year
First Semester

  • ECE 204 AC Circuits and Introduction to Systems – 3 hrs.
  • ECE 205 Microcontroller Architecture and Programming – 3 hrs.
  • MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications – 3 hrs.
  • MTH 223 Calculus III – 4 hrs.
  • PHY 201 University Physics II – 4 hrs.
    17 hours

Second Semester

  • ECE 206 Continuous-Time Signals & Systems - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 207 Simulation and Analysis for Electrical Engineers - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 208 Transmission Lines & Electromagnetic Fields - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 221 AC Circuits and Systems Laboratory - 1 hr.
  • MTH 224 Differential Equations - 3 hrs.
  • ECO 100 Introduction to Economics or CIV 100, 101, or 102 Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Junior Year
First Semester

  • ECE 301 Discrete-Time Signals & Systems - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 302 Probability, Statistics, and Random Processes for EE - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 303 Electronics - 3 hrs.
  • ECE 322 Electronics and Interfacing Laboratory - 2 hrs.
  • *Approved ECE Elective - 3 hrs.
  • ECO 100 Introduction to Economics or CIV 100, 101, or 102 Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    17 hours

Second Semester

  • ECE 497 Senior Capstone Project System Level Design - 1 hr.
  • *Approved ECE Electives – 9 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. – Fine Arts - 3 hrs.
  • Gen. Ed. – Social Forces - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Senior Year
First Semester

  • ECE 401 Undergraduate Design Seminar I - 1 hr.
  • ECE 498 Senior Capstone Project I - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Professional Electives - 6 hrs.
  • *Approved ECE Electives - 3 hrs.
  • ENG 300, 301, 305, or 306 Advanced Writing - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Second Semester

  • ECE 402 Undergraduate Design Seminar II - 1 hr.
  • ECE 499 Senior Capstone Project II - 3 hrs.
  • Approved Professional Electives - 6 hrs.
  • Gen Ed - Human Values - 3 hrs.
  • Gen Ed - Non-Western Civilization - 3 hrs.
    16 hours

Total Hours: 130

General education courses must be selected from an approved list for each category. They may be taken in any sequence, not necessarily in the semester indicated. Other university general education requirements are satisfied by specific courses required below.

*Five ECE electives are required and two must be from the core pool (ECE 431, ECE 440, ECE 441, ECE 451, ECE 470, ECE 480, and ECE 481). A list of approved courses is available from your academic advisor.

Elective Descriptions

ECE electives are available in the areas of applied electromagnetics, communications, controls, digital signal processing, digital and computer systems, embedded systems, and wireless components and systems. Approved ECE electives include all 400- and 500-level ECE courses except for ECE 401, ECE 402, ECE 497, ECE 498, and ECE 499. Special topic courses are often available. See your advisor for the most current list of approved electives.

ECE digital electives include:

  • ECE 466 Real-Time DSP Laboratory
  • ECE 467 Robotics Design Laboratory
  • ECE 470 Data-Structures and Object Oriented Programming
  • ECE 471 Real-Time Operating Systems
  • ECE 472 Embedded Microcontroller Linux
  • ECE 473 Embedded TCP/IP
  • ECE 474 Robotic Navigation with Simultaneous Localization and Mapping
  • ECE 480 Digital Systems: Communication and Interface
  • ECE 481 Digital Systems: Design and Synthesis
  • ECE 482 Digital Systems: High Level Synthesis and Codesign
  • ECE 483 Digital systems: Microprocessor Architecture and Design
  • ECE 484 Digital Systems: Peripheral Architecture and Design
  • Other special topics courses may also be approved. See your advisor for the most current list.

Professional electives allow the student to take a coherent set of courses so as to enhance the student’s competitiveness in the job market or better prepare for graduate or professional school. They can also be applied toward a minor or second major. (Note that certain minors and majors will add hours and/or time to the normal 8-semester, 130-hour program of study.) However, no more than 6 hours of ECE courses can be applied toward the 12 hours of the professional elective stem. Additional information is available in an advising handout. The student must work with an academic advisor to identify the courses he/she will use to satisfy the professional elective stem and fill out the Professional Elective Approval Form. This form must be signed by the ECE Chairman and the courses approved to fill the professional elective stem constitute a requirement for the BSEE degree for the student.

Program of Study: Electrical Engineering
(phased out as of May 2014)

Credit in the following courses must be obtained to meet degree requirements in electrical engineering, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering.

Freshman Year
First Semester
EE 101 Intro. Electrical Engineering 1
EE 102 Computers and Programming in EE 2
MTH 121 Calculus I 4
CHM 110 General Chemistry I 3
CHM 111 General Chemistry I Lab 1
ENG 101 English Composition 3
Gen. Ed.

CIV 100, 101, or 102 Western Civilization or  ECO 100 Intro. to Economics

3
17
Second Semester
COM 103 Oral Communication Process 3
MTH 122 Calculus II 4
PHY 110 University Physics I 4
Gen. Ed. Fine Arts 3
Gen. Ed. ECO 100 Intro. to Economics or CIV 100, 101, or 102 Western Civilization 3
17
Sophomore Year
First Semester
EE 201 Digital Hardware Organization 2
EE 205 Fundamentals of Circuit Analysis 4
EE 221 Data Structures and OOP 3
MTH 223 Calculus III 4
PHY 201 University Physics II 4
17
Second Semester
EE 206 Sophomore Laboratory 2
MTH 207 Elementary Linear Algebra 3
MTH 224 Differential Equations 3
PHY 202 Applied Quantum Physics 3
Gen. Ed. Social Forces 3
14
Junior Year
First Semester
EE 301 Signals and Systems I 3
EE 303 Principles of Electronics I 3
EE 365 Microprocessors 3
EE 331 Junior Laboratory I 3
ENG 300, 301, 305, or 306 Advanced Writing 3
15
Second Semester
EE 302 Signals and Systems II 3
EE 304 Principles of Electronics II 3
EE 332 Junior Laboratory II 2
EE 381 T-Lines and EM Fields 3
Approved Professional Elective 3
Gen. Ed. Human Values 3
17
Senior Year
First Semester
EE 450 Electronic Product Design 1
EE 451 Senior Laboratory I 3
Approved EE Electives 6
Approved Professional Electives 6
16
Second Semester
EE 402 Undergraduate Design Seminar 1
EE 452 Senior Laboratory II 3
Approved EE Electives 6
Approved Professional Elective 3
Gen. Ed. Non-Western Civilization 3
16
Total Hours 129