Descriptions from Faculty

May Interim 2015

ENG 124-01 American Writers
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

We will explore aspects of modern American life in short stories from some of our best and most provocative writers. We will examine forces that shape our conceptions of human values, specifically the interconnections of family and cultural values, and the ethical or moral issues posed by this literature. We will also read one novel, Foer's Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. 

Required Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary Short Stories, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer, and other stories will be provided.


ENG 130-01  Introduction to Native American Literatures  Online Course
Dr. Brill de Ramírez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this January Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literatures. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the West and the Non-Western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today. Counts for NW gen.ed. credit.

Note that this is an online class. There will be three scheduled synchronous online exams. Students will need to make sure that their schedules will accommodate the dates and times for the scheduled exams; otherwise students will need to take the class during another term when the scheduled exams will fit into their schedules:

Three synchronous exams will be held on Friday, May 22 3-4 pm, Friday, May 29, 3-4 pm; and the final exam will be held Friday, June 5 from 3-5 pm.


ENG 301-01 Advanced Writing – Argumentative Writing
Professor Anne Herbert

This on-line course focuses on an exploration of public literacy and critical engagement with current public discourse.  Students analyze and apply argumentative language and style, argumentative claims, and organizational patterns of both print and visual rhetoric. 

During the May Interim session, this class will not meet in a classroom on campus.  Rather, the course but will be delivered entirely on line through a Sakai course site, with daily assignments, Mon-Saturday.   


Summer Session I 2015

ENG 130-01  Introduction to Native American Literatures  Online Course
Dr. Brill de Ramírez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this January Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literatures. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the West and the Non-Western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today. Counts for NW gen.ed. credit.

Three synchronous exams will be held on Monday, June 15 3-4 pm, Friday, June 26, 3-4 pm; and the final exam will be held Thursday, July 9 from 3-5 pm.


Summer Session II 2015

ENG 301 Advanced Writing - Argumentative Writing
Professor Anne Herbert

This five-week on-line course focuses on an exploration of public literacy and critical engagement with current public discourse.  Students analyze and apply argumentative language and style, argumentative claims, and organizational patterns of both print and visual argumentative rhetoric.  Analysis of visual rhetoric on the Internet and in a 3-D virtual environment (SECOND LIFE) is a significant focus of this course.

Method of Instruction:

Assignments on Sakai:  This course requires extensive use of all features of Sakai to complete daily (M-F) assignments, including readings from on-line texts, video or audio presentations, and discussion forum activities.  Assignments are asynchronous, with firm due dates.

Second Life Assignments:  Second Life is a major component of this course.   Second Live assignments will begin in the 3rd week of the session (Unit 3).  

Enrollees must have reliable, high-speed Internet access.   Laptops pre-loaded with Second Life can be checked out and used in the BU Library to complete assignments in Second Life.   Personal computers must meet the system requirements for Second Life:  http://secondlife.com/support/system-requirements/

Texts: No print textbook – all instructional materials will be accessible through Sakai, Second Life, or the Internet.


ENG 305 Advanced Writing - Technical Writing
Professor Celine Bourhis

This online course is an advanced writing course (English Composition, C2)—part of the General Education Program—that will focus on strategies for effective writing. More specifically in this course, we will examine key concepts of technical writing (rhetorical situation analysis, writing conventions design, and ethical use of visuals). We will also study successful writing strategies and practice writing a variety of essential documents, such as letters, memos, reports, and proposals.

This course requires extensive use of all features of Sakai to complete daily (M-F) assignments, including readings from on-line texts, and PowerPoint slides.  Assignments are asynchronous, with firm due dates.

Enrollees must have reliable Internet access and be proficient with Sakai.

Assignments and Evaluations: Peer reviews; Exercises; Four writing projects; Final portfolio.

Required Text: Reporting Technical Information (Houp, Pearsall, and Tebeaux) 11th edition.


Fall Semester 2015

ENG 101 English Composition

English 101 prepares students to
1. write accurately, clearly, and effectively;
2. achieve an acceptable level of competency in grammar, punctuation, and 
mechanics;
3. complete all stages of the writing process successfully;
4. execute the major forms of expository writing effectively; and
5. demonstrate an acceptable level of competency in research techniques and 
documentation.


ENG 101 English Composition
Dr. Kathleen Dusenbery

ENG 101 English Composition is best described in its name--that composition is the collection and organization of a person's thoughts through writing. It is an introductory course that prepares students for various writing situations and audiences. Students will be introduced to concepts universal to writing--brainstorming, drafting, research and research evaluation, peer review, revision, audience analysis, and global revision. Peer review is an integral part of English 101, as is finding quality research and learning to utilize the research to support student arguments. The course is divided into units, or sections, that are cumulative and focus on four genres of analysis and writing. Topics for the units are generated by the students, not assigned or required by the instructor. Each unit contains a project that serves as an outline, but the student decides the specific topics. This stems from the pedagogical concept that people are most engaged in writing when they are personally invested in the subject at hand.


ENG 101-01 English Composition/ENG 124 American Writers (LINKED)
Dr. Danielle Glassmeyer

You’ve heard it before: what doesn’t break you makes you strong.  For a century, American writers and film-makers have been testing this idea.  Fiction and film give us a unique insight into what makes us human and the effects of extreme events, or trauma (such as rape, war, terrorism, racism), upon individuals.  Through literature and film we can better understand these actions – and thus guarantee our world against their repetition. We will examine how American narrative art evokes empathy for those injured and thus makes readers themselves stronger and more resilient.  In our study, we’ll use concepts from Psychology, Sociology, Political Science, and Literary and Film studies.  Because this course is combined with Comp 101, we will be able to make our readings and films the subject matter for our paper assignments, creating the kind of focus and purpose that you don’t get in other Composition classes.

Specifics: These two courses satisfy two General Education requirements – Composition (C1) and Human Values/Literature (HL).  You must sign up for both English 101-01 and English 124-01, which are on reserve - -ask your student aide for more information! Writing projects cover all the modes that a regular Comp class does, but with greater focus.  Papers will be developed through a series of stages and each will focus on a different audience. Texts include Sakai course pack along with fiction and film by artists such as Hemingway, Chaplin, Toni Morrison, Stanley Kubrick, the Coen brothers, Art Spiegelman, and J.D. Salinger.


ENG 101-06 English Composition
Dr. Jeanne Muzzillo

The general goal of this course is to prepare you for effectively meeting any of your writing needs, especially during your college experience.

Specifically, certain goals have been adopted for English 101:

Students are prepared to

  1. write accurately, clearly, and effectively;
  2. achieve an acceptable level of competency in grammar, punctuation, and mechanics;
  3. complete all stages of the writing process successfully;
  4. execute the major forms of expository writing effectively; and
  5. demonstrate an acceptable level of competency in research techniques and documentation.

Throughout this course we will emphasize process.  Students will be expected to share their work in some cases (always with advance notice), to participate in critique, and to read about and learn from professional exemplars.  All of these activities are designed to enlighten us as writers about best practices and strategies. Ultimately, you will have composed a portfolio of essays and a self-reflection summary about your writing experience and plans for moving ahead as a writer.    


ENG 115-01 Introduction to Literature
Dr. Jeanne Muzzillo

How do we define ourselves as individuals and as a society?  James Balwin has written:  “Freedom, lurked around us and I understood, at last, that he could help us to be free if we would listen, that he would never be free until we did.”  He was speaking of a blues musician, but the idea may suit all those who create and share their gifts.  Perhaps literature may be big enough to help us answer the questions about our own existence. 

Toward that end, we will be sharing common texts all included in the required anthology [found at the Bradley Bookstore]:

Readings will include plays, poems, short stories, and excerpts.  Selections will loosely follow the assigned anthology organization as the semester is thematically divided in this way:  defining the individual and his/her growth à understanding the individual’s two-directional relationship with society.  Some of the topics under advisement are: 

What qualifies as literature?
What happens when we read?  Psychology and theoretical lenses
Genre conventions and the effects of genre expectations
Efferent vs. aesthetic reading purposes and effects
Employing rhetorical conventions and styles in our own writing
What works?
How do we remain/become activist readers?
Is the “author” dead?  What about authorial intent?

Course work will include, but is not limited to:  maintaining a response notebook, essay responses, discussion participation and leadership, and most importantly completing all assigned readings.  


ENG 115-02 & 03 Introduction to Literature
Professor Tricia Dahlquist

Here’s your chance to read a wide variety of writing and share your reactions.  This course approaches literature thematically.  Within each theme, a variety of genres is covered—short story, poetry, essay, drama—a little bit for everyone.  While there are daily journals and a couple of papers to turn in, the focus of the course is the daily discussion.  You will be expected and encouraged to participate in the discussion of the selections.  That is where the true learning will take place—in the daily give and take of thoughts and ideas generated and shared by the students.


ENG 115-04 Introduction to Literature
Dr. Amy Eggert

In this course, we will read, analyze, and discuss literary works beginning with the oral tradition of storytelling and folklore through contemporary pieces of written literature.  We will study works of short fiction, poetry, ballad, blurred-genre, drama, and essay, each of which will present different ways of approaching real-world issues we encounter in our own lives.


ENG 123-01 & 02 European Writers
Professor Celine Bourhis

In this course, we will study the representation of human values in significant texts (in translation) by European writers. More specifically, we will read, analyze, and discuss six essential works of philosophical literature by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Franz Kafka, Herman Hesse, Albert Camus, and Milan Kundera. While our approach will be mostly literary, we will also study cultural, social and historical issues at stake in these texts.

Methods: Lectures and Discussions

Required Texts:

  • Notes from Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • The Trial by Franz Kafka
  • Steppenwolf  by Hermann Hesse
  • The Stranger by Albert Camus
  • The Fall by Albert Camus
  • The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

Assignments and Evaluations:

  • 10 Quizzes (50 points)
  • 6 Forum contributions (200 words each) (60 points)
  • 1 Midterm exam (120 points)
  • 1 Final paper (5 to 7 pages) (100 points)
  • 1 Final exam (120 points)
  • Participation and Class discussions (50 points)

Total: 500 points

A=500-450; B=449-400; C=399-350; D=349-300; F=299 and below.


ENG 129 Introduction to African American Literature
Professor Anne Herbert

This introductory course traces themes of African-American literary discourse through an exploration of the strong “autobiographical impulse" that characterizes this literature.  Focusing on black rhetorical traditions, both oral and written, students read slave narratives, sermons, folklore, poetry, essays, short fiction, and drama to explore the ways African American writers use black cultural forms to express visions of self, social justice, and survival. 

Method of Instruction/Assignments:  Lecture, discussion (in class and on line), short writing assignments, group poetry performance project (great fun!), literary analysis essay  

Midterm and Final Essay Exams.

Text:     Norton’s Anthology of African American Literature, 2-volume 3nd edition


ENG 130 Introduction to Native American Literature
Dr. Susan Brill de Ramirez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this January Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literature. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the west and the non-western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today.

Note that this is an online class. There will be three scheduled synchronous online exams. Students will need to make sure that their schedules will accommodate the dates and times for the scheduled exams; otherwise students will need to take the class during another term when the scheduled exams will fit into their schedules:

  1. Exam #1:  Monday, September 14, 9-10 p.m.
  2. Exam #2:  Monday, October 5, 9-10 p.m.
  3. Exam #3: Monday, November 16, 9-10 p.m.                 
  4. Final exam:  Monday, December 7, 8-10 p.m.

ENG 190-01 Women in Literature
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

ENG 190 fulfills the General Education Human Values--Literature requirement.  The goal of these courses is to provide students with a range of approaches to knowledge (critical, historical, scientific, aesthetic, etc.). In this course we will look at the ways literary works can incorporate these approaches to thinking about human situations in creative and relatable ways. In this course you will read, discuss and write about novels by women from the 19th and 20th centuries, examining how novels can express and shape our conceptions of human values, specifically the role of cultural values in forming identity, gender, and sexuality. For example, we will look at how these books differently depict: the formation of women’s identity; survival in adversity; the impact of social forces and family relations, and their psychological consequences. Also, in what ways does literature represent ethical issues or pose moral problems? We will examine aspects of storytelling such as the functions of narrators and characters, recognizing uses of language, placing styles of writing historically, and considering how these styles convey intended messages. 


ENG 207-01 Creative Writing I
Dr. Demetrice Worley

In this course we will examine, analyze, and participate in the craft of creative writing.  We will read creative texts by professional and nonprofessional writers, we write creative texts in two genres (poetry and prose), and we will share our understandings of our creative writing self/selves with each other orally and in written form. 

Methods: Discussion/Writing Workshops

Examinations: Specific Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction Writing Assignments; Poetry Terms Examination; Prose Terms Examination; and Semester Creative Writing Portfolio


ENG 207-02 Creative Writing I
Dr. Amy Eggert

This course is designed to help students write out of their b(l)ox.  That is, we practice confronting the infamous writer’s block through numerous brainstorming activities and exercises, and we practice abandoning our comfort zones for more innovative and interesting territories.  We write every day, and we share this writing with each other every day.  We read because one cannot hope to become a creative writer without first becoming a creative reader.  In this class, we will explore non-fiction, fiction, poetry, blurred genre, and experimental texts.


ENG 233 American Literature to 1865
Dr. Danielle Glassmeyer

ENG 233 introduces students to the aesthetic and cultural history and to significant texts ranging from the Native American oral tradition that preceded colonization, to literary responses to the American Civil War.  We will attend primarily to works by key literary figures, tracing how the works reflect and refract important cultural trends and aesthetic developments. So doing we will examine the terms by which "America" and "literature" have been understood by diverse writers for diverse communities.  In addition, this course will include a unit that examines through film representations of key texts,  the “unfinished business” of American identity-building that lingers in the 20th century and beyond. We will also practice skills of close reading and analysis of literature, and skills related to writing about literature. Methods of instruction include:  individual and small group learning projects, postings to Sakai forums, writing, analysis, and extensive class discussion, with possible quizzing, and conferences.


ENG 235 American Literature 1865 to the Present
Dr. Kevin Stein

This survey introduces English majors to American literature from 1865 to the Present. We’ll do so by focusing on writers embodying aspects of notable literary movements of the era, including Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Our primary goal is to provide the foundation for majors' upper-level courses in specific topics, movements, and aesthetics of American literature. Students are therefore expected to become familiar with the aesthetic, cultural, social, and literary history of the period. This admittedly daunting task will be made easier by a mixture of lecture, lively discussion, and group work. We'll also indulge ourselves by reading the work of Visiting Writers and by attending Visiting Writers Series events. In addition, this course introduces students to matters of appropriate format and style employed when writing about American literature.  


ENG 270-01 Introduction to Literary Criticism and Theory
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

This course is an introduction to the study and practice of multiple methods of literary interpretation, criticism and theory.

Course goals:  to learn a variety of theories and interpretive practices, to appreciate their intellectual relevance to education and knowledge, but to also discover how these theories and practices can influence our ways of thinking about culture, literature, and English studies.  Special emphasis will be placed on the significance and impact of the theories and their usefulness to your own progress in considering the many issues and contexts raised by, and applicable to, literary studies.  For instance, how these critical approaches can usefully broaden your own interpretive abilities and ways of thinking, providing numerous options for interpretive strategies by making literary studies instructive and relevant to your future students (if applicable) and yourself.  


ENG 301-01 & 02 Advanced Writing - Argumentative Writing
Professor Anne Herbert

This on-line course focuses on an exploration of public literacy and critical engagement with current public discourse.  Students analyze and apply argumentative language and style, argumentative claims, and organizational patterns of both print and visual argumentative rhetoric.  Analysis of visual rhetoric on the Internet and in a 3-D virtual environment (SECOND LIFE) is a significant focus of this course.

Method of Instruction:  

Asynchronous Assignments:  This course requires extensive use of all features of Sakai to complete weekly assignments, including readings from on-line texts, video or audio lectures/presentations, as well as group discussion forum activities. Most assignments are asynchronous, with firm due dates.

Synchronous Assignments:  Second Life (a 3-D virtual environment) is a major component of this course.  In addition to a one-hour face-to-face orientation session in the Bradley Library (early in semester), students will meet mid-semester in the Second Life virtual world for a mandatory one-hour presentation.  All other Second Life assignments are asynchronous activities and independent research within the virtual world.

Enrollees must have reliable, high-speed Internet access.   Laptops loaded with Second Life can be checked out and used in the BU Library to complete assignments in Second Life.   Personal computers must meet the system requirements for Second Life:  http://secondlife.com/support/system-requirements/

Texts: No print textbook – all instructional materials will be accessible through Sakai, Second Life, or the Internet. 


ENG 304-01 Advanced Writing - Research in Individual Disciplines
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

In ENG 304 students develop strategies for and successfully complete an upper-level research project. The tasks will include reading and discussion about research guided by the text Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing.  3rd ed.  New York: Pearson, 2006. Then you will proceed with planning your project through a series of written assignments including: a research proposal, a review and summary and analysis of articles in your discipline, a progress report, and drafting to produce your completed research project.


ENG 304-40 Advanced Writing - Research in Individual Disciplines 
Dr. Timothy Conley

Course Description:  In ENG 304 students develop strategies for and successfully complete an upper-level research project:

Required Text: No text

Assignments: note—all assignments must be submitted at the beginning of class on the due date; each assignment will include peer response, and being late will result in loss of up to five points for the project. 

#1 Proposal for Research Project: detailed description and justification of research project, see Bookmarks, 39-43, for list of the parts to the proposal; 15%/30 points.

#2 Summary of Article: detailed summary of article related to your research topic; 10%/20points

#3 Comparative Analysis of Articles:; comparison/evaluation of two articles related to your research topic; 10%/20 points.

#4 Progress Report: detailed report on work completed, work planned, and problems encountered and anticipated; 10%/20 points

#5 Research Project: two drafts of project and final draft (two copies); exam will be a detailed response to another project.  Entire project=45%/90 points.  Draft #1=10/90 points; draft #2=15/90 points; final draft=60 points; exam= 5 points.

Participation: in-class memos and daily assignments.  If you miss class with excused absence, you may make up missed work for up to 3 classes.10%/20 points

Extra credit: if you participate in a conference with oral presentation (such as the Scholarship Expo) and if you then submit a brief (2 pages) report on your participation, you may receive up to 10 extra credit points.


ENG 305-01 & 02 Advanced Writing - Technical Writing
Professor Tricia Dahlquist

It’s not just for engineers!  Basically, technical writing can be defined as writing to a specific audience with a specific purpose.  Whether you are majoring in engineering, math, biology, education, English, theater, …, you can benefit from developing technical techniques to allow you to write for people who are going to use that information to make a decision, to perform an action, to enrich understanding, ….  You will learn to design documents with a clear focus on the audience and purpose.  You will learn to employ technical design features such as headings, lists, graphics, and vocabulary in order to address your audience and to achieve your purpose effectively and efficiently.

In addition to a variety of shorter assignments, you will design and develop a significant and comprehensive final paper that will include both a research report and an empirical project report.


ENG 306-05 Advanced Writing - Business Communication (Legal Emphasis)
Judge (ret.) Brandt

Prerequisite: English 101 and junior standing

Credit: three semester hours

Instruction as to the method of clear and effective legal writing.


ENG 306-06 Advanced Writing - Business Communication
Dr. Susan Brill de Ramirez

ENG 306 Business Communication focuses on the range of written, oral, and digital communication skills that are required in the workplace today.  You will be learning the theories and methods of business communication, and applying them in actual practice (such as in the production of business email, professional summaries, reports, resumes, and professional social media presence via LinkedIn accounts).

The course is based on a collaborative model with the aims of improving student writing ability, practicing problem-solving skills, improving student ability to evaluate and revise communication, improving team work and leadership skills, developing a beginning professional social media presence, and learning contemporary networking strategies. Especial  foci will include the following:

  • the importance of effective and strategic business communication,
  • the increasing importance of technology and ethics,
  • the inextricably interwoven and evolving use of oral, digital, and written professional communication,
  • and the growing importance of social media (e.g., LinkedIn, blogs, Twitter, Facebook).

ENG 307 Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Dr. Kevin Stein

This is a writers’ workshop. It operates under the assumptions that fuel the engine of writerly community:  that the private act of writing can be aided, induced, encouraged, cajoled, and emboldened by the communal act of sharing that work with other writers.

The primary activity of the workshop is, of course, writing your own work as well as reading and commenting on the work of your classmates. To that end, you’ll learn and employ appropriate poetic terms to discuss workshop submissions. We’ll complement these goals by reading the work of other authors, by attending Visiting Writers Series events, and by your “discovering” a contemporary poet and critiquing her/his work. (More information on this last assignment appears on a separate assignment sheet).

Finally, please note that this is a poetry workshop. Our emphasis will thus be on the process of writing and revising POETRY (as opposed to fiction, non-fiction, or drama). 


ENG320 Young Adult Literature
Dr. Jeanne Muzzillo

In this course about young adult literature, you will be reading several works by and about young adults.  The texts will inform you about early examples of this literature and about its place historically; however, the bulk of the readings are contemporary works.  First, because this is a literature course (not methods) the emphasis is on literature studies.  However, as many of our class members will be in Teacher Education programs, discussion may take a tangential avenue toward the pedagogical.  But please remember to think of the class in this way:  you must be the first reader.  Approach all assignments and texts through your own lenses. 

Course Description and Objectives

Throughout this investigation of young adult literature, reading, discussion, and writing will be guided by these and other questions:

What definition can we generate as a collaborative group for YA literature?
How does our definition compare with those of others?
What is the history of this literature?
What is its current status?
What can we predict for YA’s popularity and for its content and form?

Topics under advisement include:

Censorship
Age appropriateness
Authenticity
Pedagogical “use”
Societal issues for teens and adolescents
The psychology of young readers
Our own writing and readerly backgrounds
Alternative forms, eg. Graphic novels, mixed genres
Adaptations and media
YA clearinghouses and awards

Specific objectives include:

Read the required texts in purposeful and participatory ways.
Compose “creative” and emulative works.
Learn about genres through comparison studies.
Document changes and trends in the field.
Research about authors, publishing, and critical works.
Create text-based discussion approaches and inquiries.
Moderate discussions.


ENG 332 Early American Literature:  The Emergence of Fiction
Dr. Timothy Conley

Course description: We will study the cultural and literary contexts for the emergence of the American novel in the latter half of the 18th century, with special attention to questions of national identity, gender and culture, and narrative forms. Our primary focus will be on the novel as a genre.[Note: three of the novels are “British”—that is written about Great Britain and by British authors.  The inclusion of these novels is not a mistake: we need to consider the novels read by Americans and influencing American authors if we are to understand the emergence of the “American” novel.]


ENG 358 18th-Century British Literature
Dr. Christine Blouch

English 358 will focus on the cultural and aesthetic history of British literature in the period from the late seventeenth to early nineteenth centuries. The course intends to engage students in a critical analysis of significant and interesting texts in a range of genres that embody issues in British cultural and literary history. Evaluation will be based on essays, a short analytical response, a presentation, a film assignment, and a Review of Criticism. 


ENG 374 Drama as Genre
Dr. Caitriona Moloney

This class will survey the evolution of drama in English beginning with the Classical Oedipus the King by Sophocles and moving to the Renaissance with Hamlet by Shakespeare. We will take a look at the Nineteenth century with Checkov’s The Cherry Orchard, Ibsen’s The Doll House, and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. We will move into the Twentieth century with Susan Glaspell’s Trifles, Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, and Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman. Moving closer to our contemporaries, we will read August Wilson’s Fences, and Caryl Churchill’s Cloud Nine. These plays will give us the opportunity to discuss and write about issues that continue to be relevant such as family, gender, and politics. Students will write two essays and take a midterm and final exam. Class will include lecture, discussion and performance of scenes.

Text: The Norton Anthology of Drama, shorter second edition, paperback. Eds Gainor, Garner & Puchner.


ENG 385 Literatures of Europe:  20th-Century Viennese Fiction
Dr. Timothy Conley

Course objectives:

The course will focus on some of the 20th-century’s best fiction, set in the cultural and historical context of modern Vienna.  We’ll study how literature reflects, modifies, and shapes and is shaped by the cultures from which it emerges.  Students will acquire skills in reading and analyzing modern fiction, in understanding the relationship between literature and culture, in discussing and writing about significant issues in modern societies, and in understanding modern European society.  This course fulfills the Human Values/Literature requirement in the General Education program; it also fulfills the World Literature requirement for English Education majors. 


ENG 660 Genres
Dr. Susan Brill de Ramirez

Study of a single genre: fiction, prose, poetry, or drama. May be repeated under a different genre for a maximum of six hours credit.

Storytelling has always been at the center of all cultures and is, therefore, culturally grounded and globally . Oral stories are often highly crafted and usually episodically and associationally structured. In oral cultures, orally related stories have traditionally been at the center of people’s lives, at the center of families’ lineage, and at the center of communities’, tribes’, and nations’ self-definitions and wholeness. Indeed today, storytelling is recognized as one of the most important element in highly successful work places.

This class will look at the role that storytelling has an continues to play in written literature and oral performance. Readings will include 1) select stories from folklore, fairy tales, and sacred scripture; 2) select works by contemporary writers (including Native American writers) that present written versions of oral stories; and 3) effective storytelling examples from the contemporary workplace. In this way, students will learn the traditions of storytelling within their culturally specific grounds, their roles and effects diachronically across time, and their vital presence today in the workplace, in advertising, in propaganda, and in individuals’ everyday lives.