Descriptions from Faculty

May I Interim 2017


ENG 130-01  Introduction to Native American Literatures Online Course
Dr. Brill de Ramírez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this January Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literatures. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the West and the Non-Western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today. Counts for NW gen.ed. credit.

Note that this is an online class. There will be three scheduled synchronous online exams. Students will need to make sure that their schedules will accommodate the dates and times for the scheduled exams; otherwise students will need to take the class during another term when the scheduled exams will fit into their schedules:

Online exams for this course are conducted synchronously on May 18 (3-4 pm), May 26 (3-4 pm) and June 2 (3-4 pm).


Summer Session I 2017

ENG 305: TECHNICAL WRITING (Online course)
Dr. Celine Bourhis

This course is designed to help students with technical backgrounds write effectively in professional settings.  Specifically, ENG 305 trains students to:

  • determine the proper organizational context of a piece of technical writing—writing addressed to a specific audience for a specific purpose;
  • organize and lay out technical information—including visual aids—so that information is immediately useful to the audience;                      
  • write with a clear, concise, and direct style;
  • become familiar with a number of conventions in technical writing (e.g. memos, letters, reports, and proposals) so that those basic elements may be adapted to a variety of writing problems and situations.

This is an online course. Students must have reliable, high-speed Internet access and must be proficient with Sakai.

Assignments: Five major papers, exercises, and peer reviews.

Required Text:  The Essentials of Technical Communication (3rd ed.) by Elizabeth Tebeaux and Sam Dragga.


Fall Semester 2017

ENG 101 English Composition

English 101 prepares students to
1. write accurately, clearly, and effectively;
2. achieve an acceptable level of competency in grammar, punctuation, and 
mechanics;
3. complete all stages of the writing process successfully;
4. execute the major forms of expository writing effectively; and
5. demonstrate an acceptable level of competency in research techniques and 
documentation.


ENG 101-17 English Composition/COM 103-05 Speech LINKED Course
Professor Rachel Lewis (ENG)/Professor Jan Frazier (COM)

The students who enroll in English 101 and Communication 103's linked class enjoy the opportunity to learn to communicate both in oral and written language during the one semester. Working together with the English and Communication instructors, the students are able to receive credit for two gen eds as well as exclusive instruction from the librarian, who develops lessons of “college” research methods just for the linked classes.

Benefits/synergies

  1. Kill two birds with one stone – English 101 and Communication 103 in one semester
  2. Stay and work together as a “family” for the semester – the bond is strengthened because of being together all week in two classes – and there's double motivation, support, and validation since the instructors work together as well.
  3. Coordination of the English essays and Communication speeches, which helps to eliminate the intimidation of the classes and increases the comfort level in both classes.
  4. Advanced research methods learned in the library – for example, Zotero -- and reinforcement of skills, goals, and study habits.
  5. 100 percent of the students who take post-evaluations of the Eng/Com linked course say they would recommend it to others.

Challenges/Difficulties 

  1. Most difficulties are possibly with the scheduling department.
  2. Coordinating and aligning our essays with our speeches.

ENG 115-03 Intro to Literature
Professor Tricia Dahlquist

Here's your chance to read a wide variety of writing selections and share your reactions. This course approaches literature thematically. Within each theme, a variety of genres is covered - short story, poetry, essay, drama - a little bit for everyone. While there are daily journals and a couple of papers to turn in, the focus of the course is the daily discussion. You will be expected and encouraged to participate in the discussion of the selections. That is where the true learning will take place--in the daily give and take of thoughts and ideas generated and shared by the students.


ENG 123 European Writers
Dr. Celine Bourhis

In this course, we will study the representation of human values in significant texts (in translation) by European writers. More specifically, we will read, analyze and discuss six novels by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Herman Hesse, Imre Kertész, Albert Camus, Milan Kundera, and Michel Houellebecq. While our approach will be mostly literary, we will also study cultural, social and historical issues at stake in these texts.

Methods: Lectures and discussions

Assignments and exams: Quizzes, six short essays, a midterm exam and a final exam

Required Texts: Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse, We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, Fatelessness by Imre Kertész, The Fall by Albert Camus, The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera, The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq                  


ENG 129 Introduction to African American Literature
Professor Anne Herbert

This introductory course traces themes of African-American literary discourse through an exploration of the strong “autobiographical impulse" that characterizes this literature.  Focusing on black rhetorical traditions, both oral and written, students read slave narratives, sermons, folklore, poetry, essays, short fiction, and drama to explore the ways African American writers use black cultural forms to express visions of self, social justice, and survival. 

Method of Instruction/Assignments:  Lecture, discussion (in class and on line), short writing assignments, group poetry performance project (great fun!), literary analysis essay  

Midterm and Final Essay Exams.

Text:     Norton’s Anthology of African American Literature, 2-volume 3rd edition


ENG 207-03 Creative Writing I
Dr. Demetrice Worley

In this course we will examine, analyze, and participate in the craft of creative writing. We will read creative texts by professional and nonprofessional writers, we write creative texts in two genres (poetry and prose), and we will share our understandings of our creative writing self/selves with each other orally and in written form.

Methods: Discussion/Writing Workshops

Examinations: Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction Writing Assignments; Literary Terms Examination; and Semester Creative Writing Portfolio

Text: Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft, 4rd ed., Janet Burroway


ENG 233 American Literature to 1865
Dr. Timothy Conley

ENG 233 is one of two required survey courses in American Literature, intended as introductory courses for English majors. As such, the course provides an overview of literary texts and movements from Native American oral literatures to the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson. We will focus on both cultural and aesthetic cultural issues: our goal will be to examine the terms by which "America" and "literature" have been understood by diverse writers for diverse communities. In addition, we will explore the ways contemporary readers/writers have interpreted these texts. Writing/reading/interpretation are themselves considered as negotiations of meaning and effect within particular groups.

We will make frequent use of computer-assisted technologies, both in and out of class, and so you must have an active e-mail account and be (or become) familiar with Sakai, Bradley's web-based teaching/learning program. I usually answer e-mail very promptly; take advantage of this opportunity to extend our exchanges beyond the given office hours. Note: the course does not satisfy the General Education-Human Values requirement.


ENG 235 American Literature 1865-Present
Dr. Danielle Glassmeyer

This course features works by some of the greatest authors in American Literature studied in a context that will heighten our attention to the cultural and aesthetic concerns that shape their works.  Works by writers like Dickinson, Chopin, Twain, Hemingway, Eliot, and Morrison will take our focus, and questions of power as realized through social control of sexuality and gender will drive our discussion of the artistic strategies these writers used to shape their messages.  Strong attention to visual texts (photos, film, graphic novels) is an added bonus in this survey course.  The Heath ​Anthology will be our main text; papers, discussion, collaborative projects and a final ​will be assigned. 


ENG 239 British Literature 1800 to Present
Dr. Caitriona Moloney

This course will examine a number of the works of British authors in an attempt to understand how historical movements and issues help shape literature and to examine how literature expands our understanding of culture, history and humanity. We will read, study, discuss and analyze such Romantic writers and texts as, Shelley’s “Ode to a Nightingale, ”Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, James Joyce ‘The Dead,” Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia and Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea. The course is structured as lecture, discussion, and group work, so participation is essential.


ENG 301-01 & 02 Advanced Writing - Argumentative Writing
Professor Anne Herbert

This on-line course focuses on an exploration of public literacy and critical engagement with current public discourse.  Students analyze and apply argumentative language and style, argumentative claims, and organizational patterns of both print and visual argumentative rhetoric.  Analysis of visual rhetoric on the Internet and in a 3-D virtual environment (SECOND LIFE) is a significant focus of this course.

Method of Instruction:  

Asynchronous Assignments:  This course requires extensive use of all features of Sakai to complete weekly assignments, including readings from on-line texts, video or audio lectures/presentations, as well as group discussion forum activities. Most assignments are asynchronous, with firm due dates.

Synchronous Assignments:  Second Life (a 3-D virtual environment) is a major component of this course.  In addition to a one-hour face-to-face orientation session in the Bradley Library (early in semester), students will meet mid-semester in the Second Life virtual world for a mandatory one-hour presentation.  All other Second Life assignments are asynchronous activities and independent research within the virtual world.

Enrollees must have reliable, high-speed Internet access.   Laptops loaded with Second Life can be checked out and used in the BU Library to complete assignments in Second Life.   Personal computers must meet the system requirements for Second Life:  http://secondlife.com/support/system-requirements/

Texts: No print textbook – all instructional materials will be accessible through Sakai, Second Life, or the Internet. 


ENG 304-40 Advanced Writing - Research in Individual Disciplines 
Dr. Timothy Conley

Course Description:  In ENG 304 students develop strategies for and successfully complete an upper-level research project:

Required Text: No text

Assignments:

#1 Proposal for Research Project: detailed description and justification of research project, see Bookmarks, 39-43, for list of the parts to the proposal; may be revised for higher grade, 10%/20 points.

#2 Comparative Analysis of Articles: comparison/evaluation of two articles related to your research topic;; 10%/20 points.

#3 Summary of Article: detailed summary of article related to your research topic; 10%/20 points

#4 Progress Report: detailed report on work completed, work planned, and problems encountered and anticipated; 10%/20 points

#5 Research Project: final draft exam will be a detailed response to another project; project=45%/90 points; exam=5%/10 points

Participation: in-class memos and daily assignments (no make up) 10%/20 points

Extra credit: if you participate in the Student Research Exposition and submit a brief (2 pages) report on your participation, you may receive up to 20 extra credit points.


ENG 305: Technical Writing (Hybrid Course) Section 04 and Section 05
Dr. Celine Bourhis

This course is designed to help students with technical backgrounds write effectively in professional settings.  Specifically, ENG 305 trains students to:

  • determine the proper organizational context of a piece of technical writing—writing addressed to a specific audience for a specific purpose;
  • organize and lay out technical information—including visual aids—so that information is immediately useful to the audience;                      
  • write with a clear, concise, and direct style;
  • become familiar with a number of conventions in technical writing (e.g. memos, letters, reports, and proposals) so that those basic elements may be adapted to a variety of writing problems and situations.

Methods: Lecture, online work and two individual conferences.

This is a hybrid course. Class meets every Tuesday. Thursdays (except for two) are reserved for online work. Students must have reliable, high-speed Internet access and must be proficient with Sakai.

Assignments: Five major papers, exercises, final exam (oral presentation).

Required Text:  The Essentials of Technical Communication (3rd ed.) by Elizabeth Tebeaux and Sam Dragga.


ENG 307 Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Dr. Kevin Stein

This is a writers’ workshop. It operates under the assumptions that fuel the engine of writerly community: that the private act of writing can be aided, induced, encouraged, cajoled, and emboldened by the communal act of sharing that work with other writers.

The primary activity of the workshop is, of course, writing your own work as well as reading and commenting on the work of your classmates. To that end, you’ll learn and employ appropriate poetic terms to discuss workshop submissions. We’ll complement these goals by reading the work of other authors, by attending Visiting Writers Series events, and by your “discovering” a contemporary poet and critiquing her/his work. (More information on this last assignment appears on a separate assignment sheet).

Finally, please note that this is a poetry workshop. Our emphasis will thus be on the process of writing and revising POETRY (as opposed to fiction, non-fiction, or drama).


ENG 320 Young Adult Literature
Dr. Melinda McBee Orzulak

With more books being published for teens than ever before, the field of adolescent literature, or YA lit, is flourishing. Books written and published expressly for teens are attracting a growing amount of attention among teachers, parents, and teens themselves, particularly as YA lit is assigned in schools, showing up on best-seller lists, and being turned into popular movies. Students in this course will engage in intensive study and analysis of YA lit. The course includes exploration of trends and issues in YA lit, from its modern origins in the 1960s to recent thematic and literary innovations, including the increasing role of nonfiction and call for diverse texts (e.g. #WeNeedDiverseBooks). The course is designed to meet the needs of English majors, teaching majors, and others with a general interest in the topic. Participation and attendance are vital to success in this course; work will be done individually and in groups. 


ENG 330 Native American Literatures
Dr. Susan Brill de Ramirez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories?  What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  This semester, we will be looking at our relationships to stories (oral, written, lived) through the lens of contemporary Native American literatures.

In our investigations into Native American literatures, we will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of peoples around the world.  We cannot begin to understand Native American literatures without addressing the painful histories of Manifest Destiny, conquest, colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, genocide, cultural destruction, poverty, and racism, along with the resilient themes of survivance, tribal sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

The assigned readings address many of the issues crucial to Native peoples today: education, health care, alcoholism and drug abuse, diabetes, economic self-sufficiency, tribal sovereignty, tribal history, representations of American Indians in the media, Indian mascots and athletic team names, DAPL (the Dakota Access Pipe Line) and NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act).

Texts for the class:

Alexie, Sherman.  The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.  New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2007.
Silko, Leslie Marmon. Ceremony. New York : Penguin, 2006.
Ortiz, Simon J.  from Sand Creek.  Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2000.
---. Woven Stone. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1992.
Brill de Ramírez, Susan, and Evelina Zuni Lucero, eds. Simon J. Ortiz: A Poetic Legacy of Indigenous Continuance. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2009.

And background readings about authors, tribes, and Indian history on the course site.
 
Films for the course:
Sherman Alexie and Chris Eyre, dir., Smoke Signals 
The Invisible Nation, documentary from the National Film Board of Canada,  http://www.nfb.ca/film/invisible_nation
On the Ice, Andrew Okpeaha MacLean, dir.
Skins, Chris Eyre, dir.
Naturally Native, Valerie Red-Horse, dir.

And other short documentaries and videos on the sakai course site.

Course Requirements and Grading:      
Short Response Papers and Journaling
Term paper project--TBD


ENG 347 Shakespeare
Dr. Thomas Palakeel

William Shakespeare’s selected plays and poetry studied in the context of culture, history, and performance. We will approach Shakespeare with some understanding of various elements of drama (plot, character, thought, diction, song, and spectacle), classical requirements of form (unities of time, place, action, and the five acts), literary characteristics (the prose, the poetry, the metaphoric language), genre and classification (tragedy, comedy, history, romance), critical heritage (neo-classical, Romantic, Victorian, psychoanalytic, new historicist, feminist) while frequently exploring the complex cultural transformations taking place in Renaissance England and the underlying historical factors in the making of Shakespeare’s art and his emblematic reputation worldwide.

Required Edition of the textbook TBA. Henry IV part 1, King Lear or Hamlet, Antony and Cleopatra, Midsummer Night’s Dream. (Two more plays to be determined.)

Lecture/Discussion/8 short essays, midterm/final/ research paper/quiz


ENG 365 Irish Literature
Dr. Caitriona Moloney

This course will include representative texts from twentieth-century Irish literature in four genres: poetry, short stories, drama, and the novel. We will examine themes including cultural nationalism and folklore, literature and colonial violence, and the relationships between class, gender, religion and identity formation. We will discuss significant social shifts and attempt answers to ongoing cultural questions. These include issues of national identity in an era of globalization, the relationship between tradition and innovation in post "Celtic Tiger" Ireland, the challenges and contradictions posed by the Northern Ireland Peace Process, as well as issues of gender, sexuality and ethnicity in the "new Ireland."

For questions about the course, contact Dr. Caitriona Moloney, cmoloney@bradley.

Texts studied may include: The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats; James Joyce, Ulysses; Siobhan Dowd, Bog Child; Paul Muldoon, Poems 1968-1998; Brian Friel, Translations; Anchor Book of New Irish Writing; Eilis Ni Dhuibhne, The Hiring Fair; Roddy Doyle, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors; Maeve Binchy, Whitethorn Woods; Colm Tóibín, Brooklyn.


ENG 408/510 Advanced Fiction Workshop
Dr. Thomas Palakeel

Advanced study of the aesthetic theory and practice of writing fiction. Cross-listed with ENG 510. Prerequisite: ENG 308 or consent of instructor.

The goal of this advanced writing workshop is to study and practice the art of writing short stories and ponder the possibilities of the novel. We might attempt some in-class poetry or nonfiction prose, but our true destination is literary fiction, or shall I say, the ‘virtual reality’ created with no software other than language. The art of fiction may not be teachable, but the craft is learnable. Our workshop offers you a learning environment suitable for writing and revising works of fiction. In the past, aspiring writers learned writing by working for newspapers or by moving to Paris. Remember Hemingway? Let us create Paris in Peoria and work on the art of fiction by writing, reading, listening, revising, polishing, exchanging criticism and applause.

Textbooks: Best American Short Stories 2016 edited by Junot Diaz; How Fiction Works by James Wood; The Art of Fiction by David Lodge

Discussion/Workshop