2013 Summer & Fall Course Descriptions Announced

March 28, 2013

May Interim I

ENG 115 Introduction to Literature
Dr. Jean Jost

This multivalenced course reads short works (poetry, drama, short stories, parts of graphic novels, letters, non-fiction) in every genre from every vantage point--every minority and every background is represented. Guaranteed to be compelling and fun.


ENG 130.01  Introduction to Native American Literatures  Online Course

Professor Brill de Ramírez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this May Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literatures. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the West and the Non-Western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today. Counts for NW gen.ed. credit.

Texts for the class:

Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Robert J. Conley, Mountain Windsong: A Novel of the Trail of Tears

Simon J. Ortiz, from Sand Creek

Simon J. Ortiz, Woven Stone

Wallis, Velma.  Two Old Women: An Alaskan Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival.

Films for the course:

Sherman Alexie and Chris Eyre, dir., Smoke Signals (readily available as DVD from the BU Bookstore or amazon.com)

Chris Eyre, dir., Skins (available via 2-day streamed rental from amazon.com or DVD purchase)

Valerie Red-Horse, dir., Naturally Native (discounted $13 price DVD purchase only from BU Bookstore)

May Interim II

ENG 115 Introduction to Literature
Dr. Jean Jost

This multivalenced course reads short works (poetry, drama, short stories, parts of graphic novels, letters, non-fiction) in every genre from every vantage point--every minority and every background is represented. Guaranteed to be compelling and fun.

 

Summer Session I

ENG 129.01 Introduction to African American Literature
Dr. Demetrice Worley

This course is an introduction to major and minor African American writers from the late 1700s to the present. 

In addition, in this general education human-values literary course, we will analyze and interpret the value systems and “selves” represented in African American literature using the lens of  the West African Cosmology, which places a major emphasis on  “community” in all of its definitions.

Method: Whole-class Discussions, and Video Presentations

Examinations: Daily Quizzes, and Three Examinations

Texts: African American Literature, Demetrice A. Worley and Jesse Perry, Jr., eds.; The Piano Lesson, August Wilson, and Sula, Toni Morrison; Course Sakai Site


ENG 385: Literatures of Europe (HL) - ONLINE COURSE

Professor Thomas Palakeel

My section of Literatures of Europe will approach the Bible as an integral part of the European literary heritage and examine the ways various translations and versions of the Bible have shaped not only literature but also other expressions of modernity such as cinema and art. Specific goals for the course include the following: 1) to be able to recognize Biblical references and allusions; 2) to develop an understanding of the art of the Biblical narrative and poetry; 3) to become familiar with the Hebrew, Greek, and Roman cultures underlying the Biblical literature; 4) to develop students' ability to interpret and appreciate literary texts in terms of the genres and styles; 5) to be able to discuss, analyze, and write about literature in an academic setting.

Fall Semester

ENG 101-08: Freshman Composition: “College Success and Ecocomposition”
Professor Brill de Ramirez

Welcome to your Freshman Composition class: “College Success and Ecocomposition.” This semester, you will be fine-tuning your writing abilities as you craft essays that are explicitly designed to help you make your college experience a success. You all come to college planning on your college years to be a crucial preparation for your future careers. These sections of ENG101 are designed to provide you with a clear roadmap to insure that you have the knowledge to make the most of your undergraduate years. The proverbial icing on the cake in this class includes two texts that will also look at some of the most pressing issues of today: climate change and environmental protection, globalization and socioeconomic stress, and environmental toxins and human health.

You will engage these topics in the essays and other work for this class. Whether you have arrived at Bradley already enjoying the writing process or whether you have found writing to be challenging in the past, in this class, you will develop your skills, habits, and understanding of writing to produce thoughtful, organized and polished papers that will be deeply meaningful to you.

Texts for the class:

Brill de Ramirez, Susan Berry. Make College Work for You: Strategic Decision-Making for Success in College & Beyond. Boston: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2013. Draft copy.

Carson, Rachel. Silent Spring. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2002.

Harris, Robert A. Using Sources Effectively.  2nd edition.  Los Angeles: Pyrczak, 2005.

Schapiro, Mark. Exposed: The Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Products and What’s at Stake for American Power. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green, 2007.

Recommended:

Hacker, Diana. A Pocket Style Manual, 5th edition. Boston: Bedford, 2009.


ENG 115-01 & 02: Introduction to Literature

Professor Patricia Dahlquist

Here's your chance to read a wide variety of writing and share your reactions. This course approaches literature thematically. Within each theme, a variety of genres is covered - short story, poetry, essay, drama - a little bit for everyone. While there are daily journals and a couple of papers to turn in, the focus of the course is the daily discussion. You will be expected and encouraged to participate in the discussion of the selections. That is where the true learning will take place - in the daily give and take of thoughts and ideas generated and shared by the students.


ENG 123-01 & 02: European Writers
Professor Celine Bourhis

Study of the representation of human values in significant texts (in translation) by European writers. More specifically, we will read, analyze, and discuss six essential works of philosophical literature by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Franz Kafka, Herman Hesse, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, and Milan Kundera. While our approach will be mostly literary, we will also study cultural, social and historical issues at stake in these texts. 


ENG 123-03: European Writers: Austrian Literature

Professor Timothy Conley

Course objectives: This course will satisfy the General Education Human Values/Literature (HL) requirement and the World Literature requirement for English Education majors.
Course goals include:

  1. to become familiar with modern and contemporary Austrian literature;
  2. to analyze the inter-relationships among fiction, history, and culture;
  3. to acquire skills in close reading, critical thinking, and clear communication about literary texts;

ENG 129-01: Introduction to African American Literature
Professor Anne Herbert

This introductory course traces themes of African-American literary discourse through an exploration of the strong "autobiographical impulse" that characterizes this literature. Focusing on black rhetorical traditions, both oral and written, students read slave narratives, sermons, folklore, poetry, essays, short fiction, and drama to explore the ways African American writers use black cultural forms to express visions of self, social justice, and survival.

Method of Instruction/Assignments: Lecture, discussion (in class and on-line), short writing assignments, group poetry performance project (great fun!), literary analysis essay

Midterm and Final Essay Exams

Text: Norton's Anthology of African American Literature, 2nd edition


ENG 129.02 Introduction to African American Literature
Dr. Demetrice Worley

This course is an introduction to major and minor African American writers from the late 1700s to the present. 

In addition, in this general education human-values literary course, we will analyze and interpret the value systems and “selves” represented in African American literature using the lens of  the West African Cosmology, which places a major emphasis on  “community” in all of its definitions.

Method: Whole-class and Small-group Discussions and Video Presentations

Examinations: Daily Quizzes and Three Examinations

Texts: African American Literature, Demetrice A. Worley and Jesse Perry, Jr., eds.; The Piano Lesson, August Wilson, Sula, Toni Morrison, and Psalm of the Sunflower, Antoinette Brim; Course Sakai Site


ENG 130.01  Introduction to Native American Literatures  Online Course.

Professor Brill de Ramírez

What is the relationship between human persons and stories? What is the relationship between oral storytelling and written literature?  Why do we read literatures and tell and listen to stories?  In this May Interim course, you will be learning how stories (oral, written, lived) powerfully communicate the realities of the world to their readers (and, in the case of films, their viewers) as demonstrated in the work of Native American writers and filmmakers.

We will explore issues of great relevance to the problems, struggles, and achievements of people around the world because Native American literature requires that we face head on the painful histories of colonization, European and Euro-American empire building, racism, and Manifest Destiny, along with the attendant themes of survivance, endurance, indigenous sovereignty, and the re-indigenization of North America.

Additionally, you will learn the broad relevance of your studies in Native American Literatures. The material you study this semester and the cultures and histories that you learn about will be directly relevant to your understandings of contemporary international and global relations. In many ways, the realities of the 21st century are defined in terms of the interactions between the West and the Non-Western world, their past historical relations, and the legacies of that past as it impacts today. Counts for NW gen.ed. credit.

Texts for the class:

Sherman Alexie, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

Robert J. Conley, Mountain Windsong: A Novel of the Trail of Tears

Simon J. Ortiz, from Sand Creek

Simon J. Ortiz, Woven Stone

Wallis, Velma.  Two Old Women: An Alaskan Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival.

Films for the course:

Sherman Alexie and Chris Eyre, dir., Smoke Signals (readily available as DVD from the BU Bookstore or amazon.com)

Chris Eyre, dir., Skins (available via 2-day streamed rental from amazon.com or DVD purchase)

Valerie Red-Horse, dir., Naturally Native (discounted $13 price DVD purchase only from BU Bookstore)


ENG 207.01 Creative Writing I
Dr. Demetrice Worley

In this introductory creative writing course, we will examine, analyze, and participate in the craft of creative writing.  We will read creative texts by professional and nonprofessional writers, we write creative texts in three genres (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction), and we will share our understandings of our creative writing self/selves with each other orally and in written form. 

Methods: Discussion/Writing Workshops

Examinations: Poetry, Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction Writing Assignments; Midterm Examination; Semester Creative Writing Portfolio

Texts: Imaginative Writing: the Elements of Craft, 3rd Edition, Janet Burroway, Course Sakai Site


ENG 233: American Literature to 1865

Professor Timothy Conley

ENG 233 is one of two required survey courses in American Literature, intended as introductory courses for English majors. As such, the course provides an overview of literary texts and movements from Native American oral literatures to the poetry of Whitman and Dickinson. We will focus on both culturan and aesthetic issues: our goal will be to examine the terms by which "America" and "literature" have been understood by diverse writers for diverse communities. In addition, we will explore the ways contemporary readers/writers have interpreted these texts. Writing/reading/interpretation are themselves considered as negotiations of meaning and effect within particular groups. We will make frequent use of computer-assisted technologies, both in and out of class, and so you must have an active e-mail account and be (or become) familiar with Sakai, Bradley's web-based teaching/learning program. I usually answer e-mail very promptly; take advantage of this opportunity to extend our exchanges beyond the given office hours. Note: the course does not satisfy the General Education-Human Values requirement.


ENG 237 British Literature to 1800

Prof. Christine Blouch 

English 237 intends to introduce you to the cultural and aesthetic history of Britain before 1800 and to introduce you to a critical analysis of significant and interesting texts. This course will familiarize you with a broad range of genres, authors, themes, and issues in British literary and cultural history.

Texts:

Norton Anthology of English Literature, Eighth Edition (3-Vol. Package: A, B, C)

Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, Norton Critical Edition

Course Evaluation:

Essays, short analytical responses, an oral presentation, and a mid-term and final exam


ENG 270: Introduction to Literary Criticism & Theory
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

Description:  this course is an introduction to the study and practice of multiple methods of literary interpretation, criticism and theory.

 Course goals:  to learn a variety of theories and interpretive practices, to appreciate their intellectual relevance to education and knowledge, but to also discover how these theories and practices can influence our ways of thinking about culture, literature, and English studies.  Special emphasis will be placed on the significance and impact of the theories and their usefulness to your own progress in considering the many issues and contexts raised by, and applicable to, literary studies.  For instance, how these critical approaches can usefully broaden your own interpretive abilities and ways of thinking, providing numerous options for creating your own classroom and interpretive strategies by making literary studies instructive and relevant to your future students and yourself. 


ENG 300-01: Expository Writing
Dr. Laurie Vickroy

Required Texts:

The Contemporary Reader by Gary Goshgarian, Eleventh Edition

The Pocket Style Manual, Diane Hacker 

Course Format and Philosophy:

This course will be conducted as a writing and discussion workshop.  Our class activities are designed to support and practice aspects of the writing process:  to encourage you to consider relevant issues and information as a basis for your papers, to help make you aware of various writing options, to organize structured peer criticisms of your work, practice stages of the composing process including prewriting and revision, to point out mechanical problems, and finally, to help you to fulfill your potential as critical thinkers and writers.

The content and context for this course will be an exploration of societal and cultural issues as they are expressed in written and visual forms.  Importantly, we will investigate how we acquire, process and structure information and the difficulties involved.

Course Objectives:

ENG 300 is designed to offer students intensive practice in the major techniques of exposition, that is, informative writing.  These techniques include the modes of classification, comparison and contrast, analysis, persuasion/argument and personal narration.  You will also be asked to:

            1.  apply the skills of analysis and criticism to expository writing;

            2.  adapt the forms of composition to specific audiences and purposes;

            3.  improve writing styles;

            4.  review usage, grammar, and mechanics


ENG 300-02  Writing about the Humanities
Dr. Jean Jost

Venture back into the history of mankind as we read 12 chapters of ancient and medieval history and write varied topics about this fascinating period of time. See how the ancient era evolved into the modern West. Innovative and Intriguing.


ENG 301-01: Argumentative Writing

Dr. Palakeel
MWF 10:00-10:50 BR 135

We will write 5 essays in the persuasive mode, drawing on a wide range of readings on human nature, government, wealth, gender, language, education, and so on with a view of communicating effectively with multiple audiences. The class also seeks to advance close reading and critical thinking.

Required TEXT: Lee Jacobus A World of Ideas 9th Edition.

Writing/Group Discussion/Journals


ENG 301-02 & 03: Advanced Writing – Argumentative Writing

(ON-LINE – Sakai and Second Life Virtual World)

Instructor: Prof. Anne Herbert

This on-line course focuses on an exploration of  public literacy and critical engagement with current public discourse.  Students analyze and apply argumentative language and style, argumentative claims, and organizational patterns of both print and visual argumentative rhetoric.  Analysis of visual rhetoric on the Internet and in a 3-D virtual environment (SECOND LIFE) is a significant focus of this course.

Method of Instruction:

Asynchronous Assignments:  This course requires extensive use of all features of Sakai to complete weekly assignments, including readings from on-line texts, video or audio lectures/presentations, as well as group discussion forum activities. Most assignments are asynchronous, with firm due dates.

Synchronous Assignments:  Second Life (a 3-D virtual environment) is a major component of this course.  In addition to a one-hour face-to-face orientation session in the Bradley Library (early in semester),  students will meet mid-semester in the Second Life virtual world for  a mandatory one-hour presentation.  All other Second Life assignments are asynchronous activities and  independent research within the virtual world.

Enrollees must have reliable, high-speed Internet access.   Laptops loaded with Second Life can be checked out and used in the BU Library to complete assignments in Second Life.   Personal computers must meet the system requirements for Second Life:  http://secondlife.com/support/system-requirements/

Texts: No print textbook – all instructional materials will be accessible through Sakai, Second Life,  or the Internet. 


ENG 301-04: Argumentative Writing
Dr. Seth Katz

ENG 301: Argumentative Writing is primarily offered as one of the options for fulfilling the upper-level writing requirement in the general education curriculum.  The University’s “General Education Program Description” states that

The upper-level writing courses prepare students to:

  • write for a variety of audiences and contexts for multiple purposes, including advanced intellectual and scholarly work;
  • reinforce the skills of mechanics, usage, and grammar and research techniques developed in the 100-level writing requirement;
  • develop sophisticated writing styles appropriate to upper-level undergraduate studies;
  • refine abilities in critical thinking and writing. (http://www.bradley.edu/academics/gened/GenEdProgramNC.pdf)

ENG 301: Argumentative Writing is described in the University Catalog as follows:

Trains ability to think critically and write persuasively; logical and emotional appeals in writing. (http://www.bradley.edu/pubs/UC2005-06pdfs/ENG.pdf)

In this section of ENG 301: Argumentative Writing, we will, in some measure, cover all of the territory sketched by these official descriptions.  More succinctly, we will learn something about both analyzing and composing arguments, and we will discover that arguments, in the formal rhetorical sense—an attempt to assert or support a point, to persuade, or to reconcile apparently conflicting points (not to be confused with a simple dispute or disagreement)—is something we do all the time every day.  In fact, some have argued that “everything’s an argument.”  We’ll see.


ENG 304-40: Research in Individual Disciplines

Professor Timothy Conley

In ENG 304 students develop strategies for and successfully complete an upper-level research project: the course fulfills the General Education C2 requirement. Section 40 is limited to students enrolled in the Honors Program.


ENG 305, Sections 1 & 2: Technical Writing (Gen. Ed. C2)

Professor Patricia Dahlquist

After graduation, students will be expected to write for people who will use the information to make decisions, to perform actions, to enrich understanding,...; therefore, ENG 305 introduces students to writing effectively on the job or in professional settings. Specifically, ENG 305 trains students

  • to determine the proper organizational context of a piece of technical writing - writing addressed to a specific audience for a specific purpose;
  • to organize and lay out technical information - including illustrations - so that information is immediately useful to the audience;
  • to write in an effective style (words, sentences, paragraphs) as directly, economically, and clearly as possible;
  • to become familiar with the conventions of various kinds of technical writings (letters, memos, proposals, procedure reports, ...) so that these conventions can be adapted easily to a variety of writing problems and situations.

In addition to a variety of shorter assignments, students will design and develop a significant and comprehensive final paper that will include both a literature review and an empirical project report.


ENG 305-03 & 05: Technical Writing

Professor Celine Bourhis

For engineering and science students: techniques of exposition and report writing. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and junior standing.

English 305 is designed to help students with technical backgrounds write effectively in professional settings.  Specifically, this course trains students to:

• write with a clear, concise, and direct style;

• determine the proper rhetorical situation of a piece of technical writing; 

• lay out technical information—including visual aids—so that information is effective and useful to the audience;                       

• become familiar with a number of writing conventions in technical writing (e.g. memos, letters, reports, proposals) so that those basic elements may be adapted to a variety of writing situations. 


ENG 305-04: Technical Writing

Dr. Peter Dusenbery

Because students with technical undergraduate backgrounds
must be able to write for people who will use the information (to make
a decision, to perform an action, to enrich understanding, etc.), ENG
305 introduces students to writing effectively on the job or in
professional settings. Specifically, ENG 305 trains students
   1. to determine the proper organizational context of a piece of
technical writing--writing addressed to a specific audience for a
specific purpose;
   2. how to organize and lay out technical information--including
visual aids--so that information is immediately useful to the
audience;
   3. to write with an effective style (words, sentences, paragraphs),
as directly, economically, and clearly as possible;
   4. to become familiar with the conventions of various kinds of
technical writing (for example, letters, memos, proposals, procedure
reports, recommendation reports), so that these conventions can be
easily adapted to a variety of writing problems and situations.

Texts:
   1. Houp, Reporting Technical Information, 11th edition.
   2. Williams, Style: The Basics of Clarity and Grace, 4th edition.
   3. You will also need access to the style manual of your
discipline, a dictionary, and the SAKAI course website.

I will adapt assignments to fit each student's major, background,
and/or interests.


ENG 306-03: Business Communication

Instructor: Susan Manley

This advanced writing course (Gen. Ed. C2) provides students with practical experiences and proven strategies for effective professional writing and business communication. Throughout the semester, students will focus on adapting messages for given audiences and purposes, and they will create a variety of business documents. They will also have the opportunity to practice interviewing techniques and to learn the fundamentals of non-verbal communication. This course, which includes individual and collaborative writing assignments, applies to all majors.

At the end of the semester, students will submit a comprehensive portfolio project to demonstrate what they have learned about professional writing and communication.  


ENG 306.04 Business Communication
Dr. Demetrice Worley

Principal types of business letters and reports. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and junior standing. This section will be taught in the English Department’s computer lab.


ENG 307-01: Creative Writing II

Professor Kevin Stein

This is a writers’ workshop. It operates under the assumptions that fuel the engine of writerly community:  that the private act of writing can be aided, induced, encouraged, cajoled, and emboldened by the communal act of sharing that work with other writers. 

The primary activity of the workshop is, of course, writing your own work as well as reading and commenting on the work of your classmates. To that end, you’ll learn and employ appropriate poetic terms to discuss workshop submissions.  We’ll complement these goals by reading the work of other authors, by attending Visiting Writers Series events, and by your “discovering” a contemporary poet and critiquing her/his work.  (More information on this last assignment appears on a separate assignment sheet).

Finally, note that the emphasis of this particular section will be on the process of writing and revising POETRY (as opposed to fiction, non-fiction, or drama).  You may, with the instructor’s permission, include a small selection of these other modes in your final portfolio if such work relates in theme, motif, or technique to the poetry you create this semester.


ENG 307-02: Intermediate Poetry Workshop
Dr. Devin Murphy

In this intermediate fiction writing workshop our focus will be on the intensive study and production of imaginative work. We’re going to look closely at published and student work in order to gain a deeper insight into the genre. Produce two short stories this semester, workshop two in class, and hand in a portfolio of writing exercises and revised stories at the end of the term.


ENG 311: Introduction to Language

Dr. Seth Katz

ENG 311 works to fulfill the Mission of the Department of English by helping to broaden students' understanding of and facility with language, and enabling “students to become conversant with multiple critical approaches and acquainted with significant primary and secondary texts.”  ENG 311 will examine various approaches to understanding language variation among different social, ethnic, and racial groups; language differences between the genders; language change; child language acquisition; issues in language, reading, and writing; and a basic introduction to the basic fields of linguistic study: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics.

For those students majoring in English Secondary Education, this course will help in preparing them to meet the following NCTE standards:

3.1.3 Demonstrates an awareness in his/her teaching of the impact of cultural, economic, political, and social environments on language.

3.1.4 Knows and respects diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographic regions, and social roles and shows attention to accommodating such diversity in his/her teaching.

3.1.5 Demonstrates knowledge of the English language and the historical influences on its various forms, and uses this knowledge in his/her teaching.

3.1.7 Uses his/her knowledge of semantics, syntax, morphology, and phonology in teaching his/her students how to use oral and written language


ENG 336: Re-scripting Gender in Post-World-War-II Fiction and Film

Dr. Danielle Glassmeyer

We'll be reading seminal re-thinkings of gender in the period following World War II by writers such as Norman Mailer, JD Salinger, Ralph Ellison, Jack Kerouac, Saul Bellow and in films such as Rear Window, On the Waterfront, The Searchers, and Psycho. Our goal will be to investigate how efforts to reconstruct gender in the post-world-war-II period were answered, challenged, and sometimes facilitated by literary and film texts. Our governing methodology will be inquiry driven by insights from narrative theory, film theory, and cultural studies (methods will be part of the subject matter for the course). Our practices will be discussion, short postings and a longer researched paper.


ENG 341 Love and War in Medieval Literature
Dr. Jean Jost 

Come take a horse-back ride all the way to the Middle Ages as we encounter the sensational--interesting instances of love and war!  Short stories and poetry--some translations and some in the exciting language of the time. Join us for our own personal pilgrimage.


ENG 373 Fiction as Genre. Fall, 2013.  MWF 11:00- 11:50

INSTRUCTOR: Peter Dusenbery

APPROACH: The catalog description of this course is “study of theories and significant examples of fiction as genre.” I am going to emphasize the adaptation of literary fiction (including novels and short stories) to film.

      Rationale--

(1)  The interaction between—and mutual influence of—literature and film has been intense since the beginning of the 20th Century. Harris Ross, in Film as Literature, Literature as Film (Greenwood Press, New York, 1987, p. 1) estimates that about 40% of Hollywood films are literary adaptations and more than 75% Academy Awards for “best picture” have been to literary adaptations. In addition, the Ross bibliography contains 2500 articles and books on the relationship published between 1908 and 1985 on the relationship between literature and film. Since 1985, the number of case studies and theoretical writing on this subject has exploded (especially in connection with theories of narrative).

(2)   In spite of (or because of?) the ubiquity of visual images in the lives of 21st Century people, “cineliteracy” is a glaring weakness in all levels of American education. David Cook argues that most of us are ignorant of the operations of film language inundating our lives, and are therefore likely to be “manipulated by those who presently control it” (A History of Narrative Film, New York, 1996, xviii).

 This course attempts to address this need.

 OBJECTIVES: The course will

       1. Introduce students to adaptation theory and other historical and aesthetic theories related to the analysis of the artistic forms of fiction and film. .

       2. By applying theoretical frameworks to case-study comparisons, encourage students to deepen their awareness of the common ground between narrative literature and film, while also clarifying the unique characteristics of each artistic medium. 

       3. Through discussion and writing, to help students articulate this awareness as a self-conscious method they further develop in careers and advanced study.

METHOD: analysis of novels, short stories, and films (all films will be shown during class time); structured group discussion; weekly response papers; two analytical papers.

TEXTS/FILMS: The central text is Desmond & Hawkes, Adaptation: Studying Film & Literature. McGraw Hill, 2006.  I’ll be considering a variety of types of adaptations, and will announce titles late spring or early summer.      


ENG 380 (AKA ENG 310) Readings for Writers: Notions of Poetic “Self”

Professor Kevin Stein

COURSE CONTENT AND DESIGN: What We’re Up to and Why

ENG 380 (AKA ENG 310): Readings for Writers will engage the slippery notion of  “self” in an age where the relationship between the poetic self and the writerly self continues to be interrogated, revised, and reimagined. 

Simply put, we’ll ask who (seemingly) speaks each contemporary poem we engage. We’ll do so by examining both the aesthetic techniques that undergird the writerly act of creating an identifiable poetic “self” and our readerly assumptions that issue from engaging that voiced “self.” Here’s what we’ll do:

1)    We'll thus begin with a look into Confessional poetry that assumes (rightly or wrongly) direct connections between poet and speaker. In this work the poet intentionally links and the reader purposely conflates the voices of poet and speaker as identical. Here, we’ll read Sharon Olds, Anne Sexton, and others.

2)    We’ll also examine poets in the charged middle ground of personal and communal voice, poets whose poems appear ostensibly to be personal evocations but carry as well larger cultural implications that extend beyond any supposed individual poetic speaker. Here, we’ll read James Wright, Tony Hoagland, Kim Addonizio, Dean Young, and others.

3)    Finally, we’ll study poets whose work overtly takes on the voice of another, work that engages the poetic techniques of persona and dramatic monologue to forge a believable (if fictively constructed) human “self.” Here, we’ll read Andrew Hudgins and others.

Assignments will intermingle careful readerly analysis with writerly practice of poetic technique. Students will first analyze and write about the forms, techniques, and aesthetics of each studied mode. Then students will write their own poems employing these elements to good effect.

In short, this is a learn-by-reading and a learn-by-doing course. Student writers will examine, come to understand, and then creatively apply the aesthetic principles undergirding poets’ various manipulations of the notion of “self.”

COURSE PURPOSE: Who Will Benefit from This Course

ENG 380 (AKA ENG 310): Readings for Writers offers students literary texts examined from writerly perspectives. This approach serves the needs of students who wish to understand a literary form from the blended viewpoints of both reader and practitioner and/or who wish to refine means of creating their own literary texts.

The course thus focuses on students’ becoming conversant with a particular literary form’s aesthetic theories and applied practices – and then creating their own works in that form. The purpose of such study is less to interpret a text than to understand how a piece of writing is made and how it functions as artistic object. Even the Greek root of the word “poetry” echoes this notion of making, for poesis translates as “to make.”

In sum, ENG 310: Readings for Writers enriches students’ knowledge of aesthetic craft not only to deepen their understanding of a literary form but also to enliven fresh works of their own designs. 


English 381: Literatures of Asia

Dr. Palakeel
MWF 9:00-9:50 BR 135

This Gen Ed Non-Western Civ/English Literature course will focus on the intellectual and aesthetic aspects of key literary works in different Asian languages available in English translation. This semester most of our readings have been chosen from the three major literary traditions of Asia: the Chinese, Indian, and Japanese. Also included in our study are films and excerpts from postcolonial works written in English. 

Lecture/Discussion

Midterm/Final exam; one paper presentation/writing exercises.

Textbooks include: The Mahabharata, The Bhagavat Gita, The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry,and The Anthology of Japanese Literature


ENG 385: Literatures of Europe

Dr. L. Vickroy

vick@fsmail.bradley.edu

This course will focus on French literature and film that explores life in Paris in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will read literary works (novels, stories, poetry), study films, and will examine historical and cultural contexts that help us understand the importance of Paris for artistic, intellectual, and social developments. 


English 407/507  Screenwriting 

Dr. Palakeel
M evenings 6:00-8:45 PM             

Course Description: This advanced creative writing workshop is offered in collaboration between the English Department and the College of Fine Arts. The primary activity this semester for each student would be the writing and development of a script for a full length feature film. Several Hollywood based professionals will participate online throughout the semester as guest speakers and consultants.

Textbooks: Writing in Pictures by Joseph McBride; also screenplays available free online

Workshop/Lectures/Film screening


ENG 570-01: Literary Criticism & Theory
Professor Brill de Ramirez

Course Description:

  • How do we read works of literature, and what are the various ways by which we approach, interpret, and evaluate literary “texts”? 
  • How have literary critics and others evaluated, over time, these texts as “worthy” of study, and what forces have determined which works are thereby privileged as those most important to teach? 
  • And perhaps most importantly, why are we humans drawn to good stories? 
  • What is it that makes literary writing different from all other writing? 
  • And why have stories (written, film, oral, lived) had very important and enduring roles in the formation, endurance, and vitality of all cultures across time? 

In this course, we will explore the ways by which language and literature come to signify many things—both about literature, about the world, and about how we can come to diverse literary critical understandings.

Texts under consideration for the class:

Baudrillard, Jean. America. New York: Verso Press, 1988.

Baudrillard, Jean. The Gulf War Did Not Take Place. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995.

Bennett, Andrew, and Nicholas Royle.  An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory. 4th ed. Edinburgh, UK: Pearson Longman, 2009.

Glissant, Edouard. Poetics of Relation. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005

Leitch, Vincent, et al. Norton Anthology of Criticism and Theory. New York: W. W. Norton, 2001.

Waugh, Patricia, ed.  Literary Theory and Criticism.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.