Course Descriptions

HIS 201 - Violence, Crime, and Punishment in U.S. History (3 hours)
This course explores the social, political, and cultural history of violence, crime, criminal law, policing, and punishment in the United States from the Colonial period to the present.

HIS 203 - American History and Global Systems to 1877 (3 hours)
Surveys the transnational history of the Americas and the United States to 1877. Emphasizes globally significant trends and systems such as colonialism, mercantilism, nationalism, and the slave trade. Investigates the relevance of systems and their supporting beliefs to the growth and limits of democracy.

HIS 204 - United States History Since 1877 (3 hours)
Surveys American history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction period to the present. Emphasizes industrialization, urbanization, the shift toward a consumer economy, and the struggle to realize democracy in a society divided along lines of race, class, gender, sexuality, ideology, and national origin.

HIS 205 - Non-Western Civilization: Latin America (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Major social, economic, and political institutions and forces that have shaped Latin American society. Emphasis on socioeconomic changes in the 20th century that have polarized the social class structure and encouraged political upheaval.

HIS 206 - Non-Western Civilization: the Middle East Since Muhammad (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
History of the Middle East from the time of the prophet Muhammad to the present. Pre-modern, modern, and contemporary Middle East.

HIS 207 - Non-Western Civilization: Modern Japan, 1860-Present (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
The rise of modern Japan: The growth of Japanese power and its influence in the world economy.

HIS 208 - Non-Western Civilization: Russian History (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Russian and Soviet history from its origins to the present. Major features of pre-modern, modern, and contemporary Russian civilization.

HIS 300 - The United States Since 1945 (3 hours)
Social-cultural, political, economic, and diplomatic aspects of U.S. history since 1945.

HIS 301 - Topics in American History: Intellectual (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 302 - Topics in American History: Diplomatic (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 303 - American Urban History (3 hours)
Growth and development of American cities in historical context.

HIS 304 - Women in American History (3 hours)
Political, economic, and social status of women in American society since Colonial times. Reasons for the changing role of women; major problems confronting women in the 20th century.

HIS 305 - American Indian History (3 hours)
History of the first Americans; Indian-White relations since 1492. Origins and varied cultures of American Indians.

HIS 306 - The United States Civil War Era (3 hours)
U.S. history 1830-1877: events and developments leading to civil war, the war itself, and efforts to reconstruct the Union after 1865.

HIS 307 - History of the Early American Republic (3 hours)
Explores the evolution of early national and state governments and the various attempts at practicing democracy in a nation that incorporated chattel slavery and limited suffrage. Investigates how individuals and groups employed democratic ideals to gain access to power. Analyzes civic ideals and practices with particular attention to Native Americans, African Americans, and women. Contextualizes the coming of the Civil War.

HIS 308 - Topics in American History: Political (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 309 - The History of U.S. Law Enforcement (3 hours)
Historical roots of American law enforcement; establishment of an organized police in the U.S.; historical efforts to improve American police work.

HIS 310 - America and Vietnam 1940-Present (3 hours)
The Vietnam War: America's role in it and its legacies for both nations.

HIS 311 - History of American Political Economy (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Analyzes the economic history of the United States, stressing the influence of government policy on economic development.

HIS 314 - Non-Western Civilization: Japan & World War II (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Analyzes Japanese militarism and expansionism and examines the significance of Japan's World War II defeat and its impact on the Asian/Pacific world.

HIS 315 - U.S. Social Movements (3 hours)
Explores the major social movements of recent U.S. history. Study of the labor movement, the civil rights movement, Chicano and American Indian movements, campus and counterculture radicalism, anti-war protests, women's rights, gay and lesbian rights, environmentalism, and the nuclear freeze movement, with an examination of how activists crafted a politics of protest as they fought for greater equality and justice. Analyzes the roles that social movements played in strengthening democratic ideals and practices by expanding the role of the citizen in the community, the nation, and the world.

HIS 316 - African American History Since 1877 (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Explores the integral place of African Americans in American history and culture from Reconstruction to the present. Analyzes historical achievements of African Americans, as well as social changes and cultural perspectives on race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation that have shaped the black experience. Topics include Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration, black protest organizations, labor, the Harlem and Chicago Renaissances, art and cultural production, the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, and historical and contemporary American racial politics.

HIS 317 - American Masculinities (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. CD
Investigates the historical development, change, and expression of gender ideals that Americans have labeled manhood, manliness, or masculinity. Incorporates methodologies from history, gender studies, literary studies, and the social sciences to explore how disparate gender ideals have articulated with distinctions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and nation. Applies an interdisciplinary approach to provide students with an awareness of the historically and culturally contingent nature of masculinity and how notions of masculine ideality have reinforced or challenged structures of privilege and exclusion. Develops skills of interdisciplinary gender analysis in the study of historical documents and artifacts.

HIS 320 - Renaissance and Reformation (3 hours)
Renaissance and Reformation as part of the transitional era between the Medieval and Modern ages. Renaissance emphasis on reason and humanism balanced by Reformation focus on faith and spiritual concerns.

HIS 321 - Topics in European History: Intellectual (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 323 - Ancient Greece and the Hellenistic World (3 hours)
An examination of ancient Greek and Hellenistic societies, politics, and cultures from circa 1200 to 30 BCE. Introduces the Minoan and Mycenaean precursors before exploring the Archaic and Classical eras in detail. Follows Alexander's conquests and investigates cross-cultural influences and everyday lives in the Hellenistic nation-states.

HIS 324 - Barbarians in History (3 hours)
Significant barbarian invaders of Inner Asia; their role in the development of human civilization.

HIS 325 - Roman Civilization (3 hours)
Values and institutions of Roman society during Kingship, Republic, and Empire periods. Emphasis on the Republic at its peak, Rome's imperialism, and complex issues involved in Rome's fall; also impact of Roman values and practices on Western civilization.

HIS 326 - Modern Military Forces and Institutions (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
European and American military experiences: 1700 to present.

HIS 327 - Topics in European History: Cultural (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 328 - England and the American Revolution (3 hours)
American Revolution from the perspective of the common Anglo-Saxon cultural, political, economic, intellectual, and social heritage.

HIS 329 - Modern Germany 1870-Present (3 hours)
Examines German history in the modern era of unification, imperialism, war and revolution, Weimar democracy, Nazi racial dictatorship, World War II and genocide, Cold War division, and processes of reunification since 1989.

HIS 330 - Modern China (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
The People'\x1as Republic of China is the most populous nation in the world, and for more than a decade it has had one of the largest and fastest growing economies. The last two centuries, however, have seen a succession of states and governments rise and fall in China, tremendous prosperity as well as great poverty, periods of relative social stability and of extreme unrest, continuous and yet changing involvement with the outside world, and fluctuations in what it has meant to be Chinese. This course will examine China's rich history since the 17th century in order to foster greater understanding of one of the most complex and vibrant countries in world history.

HIS 331 - Samurai in Japanese History (3 hours)
Describes the rise and fall of Japan'\x1as warrior class and the bushido ethos. The long history of the samurai begins in the 8th century and continues to the present. Focus on two interrelated themes: the historical reality of the samurai and the construction of mythology in both Japanese popular culture and the Western imagination. Topics include warfare, training, values, literature, and family life. Visual sources, including film, are used extensively.

HIS 332 - Topics in Modern Latin American History (3 hours)
Offers a deeper understanding of Latin American societies by focusing on one region or country and highlighting events, changes, and important achievements in their broader world context. Emphasizes social changes and cultural perspectives on race, class, gender, religion, sexuality, nation, social justice, ideology, reform, protest, revolution, and poverty. Broad topics include independence movements, regionalism vs. nationalism, neocolonialism, industrialization, politics and the state, the influence of the United States, migration, and globalization.

HIS 333 - Cross-Cultural Contacts (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Cross-cultural encounters inspire societies to look more closely at themselves and sometimes to change in significant ways. In some cases, contact created enduring conflict and misunderstanding. In other cases, contact led to mutually beneficial achievements. This course investigates examples of cross-cultural contacts in world history.

HIS 334 - Non-Western History: Social (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 335 - Modern Mexico (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Social, economic, and political development of Mexico since independence. Contemporary problems facing a developing country which has already experienced one social revolution.

HIS 336 - Early Non-Western History and Geography (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Analytical and comparative survey of the formative stages of early non-Western civilizations in five geographical regions. The basic cultural patterns and geographical patterns that emerged between approximately 3500 BCE and 1500 CE will be studied, compared, and related to present developments.

HIS 337 - Modern Non-Western History and Geography (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Growth and development of non-Western civilizations since c. 1500 CE in their geographical contexts. Reactions of indigenous peoples and cultural patterns to Western penetration and imperialism. Present development and practices.

HIS 338 - Russia Since 1917 (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
History of Russia from the Bolshevik Revolution to the present. Political, social, economic, and cultural development and theories.

HIS 339 - Women in Global Perspective (3 hours)
The changing status of women in light of global economic, social, and political changes in different regions of the world. How women have participated in and contributed to 20th century transformations of the family, community, workplace, social organization, and politics.

HIS 340 - Twentieth-Century Europe (3 hours)
An analytical survey of European history since 1900. Background information on the period before 1914; the First World War and its effects; the rise of fascist, communist, and conservative dictatorships in the 1920s and 1930s; the Second World War and Nazi genocide; major institutions and problems during the Cold War division of Europe; revolutions of 1989-91 and their aftermath.

HIS 341 - The French Revolution (3 hours)
An introduction to the varied origins, tumultuous events, international ramifications, and debated aftermaths of the French Revolution

HIS 342 - Europe, 1789-1914 (3 hours)
An analytical survey of the "long 19th century" from the French Revolution to the First World War, with an emphasis on social, political, and cultural change. Subjects discussed include the following: the political agenda established by the French Revolution, and ideological responses to it (liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, and socialism); the rise of industrial capitalism and its attendant social and political divisions; competing ways of building and controlling the nation-state; democratizing movements of labor and feminism; everyday family life, gender relations, and sexuality; nationalism/imperialism; cultural movements from Romanticism to Realism to Modernism.

HIS 343 - The Enlightenment (3 hours)
The development and influence of the European Enlightenment between the late 17th and early 19th centuries. The social, cultural, political, economic, and religious contexts for intellectual transformation. The legacies of the Enlightenment in the present, and contemporary culture in light of the past.

HIS 345 - The History of England I (3 hours)
The history of England from the earliest times to 1660.

HIS 346 - The History of England II (3 hours)
The history of England from 1660 to the present.

HIS 350 - Historical Methods Seminar (3 hours)
Exploration of historical arguments and debates; methods of interpreting primary sources. Prerequisite: History major or consent of instructor.

HIS 351 - Topics in Historical Methods (0-3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

HIS 375 - The Holocaust (3 hours)
Origins and course of Nazi genocide against Europe's Jews during the Second World War. Discussion of the Nazis' five million other victims. Survival and resistance. Comparisons with other examples of modern genocide.

HIS 382 - European Women, Gender, and Sexuality Since 1500 (3 hours)
Investigates changes in women and families, gender norms and relations, and sexual identities and behaviors in modern Europe. Shows how a gender approach increases understanding of important historical developments, including Renaissance and Reformations; Enlightenment and revolutionary eras; rise of capitalism, socialism, liberalism, and nationalism; total wars, dictatorships, and democracies.

HIS 385 - Science, Technology, and Society (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
An analysis of the interaction between science, technology, and society since the 1600s. The first part addresses the Scientific Revolution, the second the Industrial Revolution, and the third the contemporary scientific and industrial revolutions. In the third part of the course, the examples of the earlier scientific and industrial revolutions, insofar as they affected religious views, daily living conditions, and the meaning of philosophy and science, provide material for comparison as a means of understanding the contemporary situation. Particular attention is given to how social values and assumptions determine the direction of scientific and technological developments.

HIS 405 - Independent Reading in History (1-3 hours)
Directed reading by qualified students with faculty guidance. For history majors primarily. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hrs. credit. Prerequisite: history major or consent of department chair.

HIS 406 - Individual Study in History (1-3 hours)
Special study of individual topics in history with faculty supervision. For history majors primarily. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hrs. credit. Prerequisite: history major or consent of department chair.

HIS 450 - US History Research Seminar (3 hours)
Research paper required employing primary sources in U.S. history. May be repeated under different topic for a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: HIS 203 or 204; HIS 350; and history major; or consent of instructor.

HIS 451 - Global Hist Colloquium (3 hours)
Research paper required employing primary sources in European history. May be repeated under different topic for maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: HIS 350; a 300-level European history course; and history major; or consent of instructor.

HIS 452 - Area Studies Research Seminar (3 hours)
Research paper required employing primary sources in African, Asian, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or Russian history. May be repeated under different topic for a maximum of six hours. Prerequisite: HIS 205, 206, 207, or 208, or 300-level course in Area Studies; HIS 350; and history major; or consent of instructor.