Philosophy Courses

PHL 102 - Logic (3 hours)
Develops skills in analysis and evaluation of reasoning in everyday situations; improves insights into argument construction and exact methods of proof.

PHL 103 - An Inquiry Into Values (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
Major value issues addressed by the world's most influential philosophers.

PHL 201 - Philosophy Proseminar I (3 hours)
An overview of the history of philosophy from Thales to William of Ockham. An introduction to doing philosophical research and writing. Prerequisite: Philosophy major or minor; or permission of the instructor.

PHL 202 - Philosophy Proseminar II (3 hours)
An overview of the history of philosophy from Francis Bacon to recent thought. A workshop for cultivating philosophical writing and research skills. Prerequisites: Philosophy majors or minors or consent of instructor.

PHL 300 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3 hours)
Development of ideas having a significant influence on Western thought during ancient and medieval times.

PHL 304 - Renaissance and Modern Philosophy (3 hours)
Development of ideas having a significant influence on Western thought during the Renaissance and modern periods, terminating with the philosophy of Hegel.

PHL 306 - Recent Philosophy (3 hours)
Development of ideas having a significant influence on Western thought during the 19th and 20th centuries.

PHL 307 - Classical Political Philosophy (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
Systematic political thought in Western philosophy during ancient and medieval times. Cross listed as PLS 307. Prerequisite: junior standing.

PHL 308 - Modern Political Philosophy (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
From the beginning of the modern period through the 19th century. Cross listed as PLS 308. Prerequisite: junior standing.

PHL 311 - Existentialism (3 hours)
Philosophical meaning of existentialism and its relation to literature, theology, psychology, and psychiatry. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy or religious studies, or consent of instructor.

PHL 320 - Symbolic Logic (3 hours)
Logical systems: propositional and predicate calculi. Truth tables, proofs, tautologies, principles of inference, Boolean algebra, DeMorgan's Laws, quantifiers, representations, and set theory. Cross-listed as CS 320. Prerequisite: MTH 120.

PHL 344 - Philosophy of Religion (3 hours)
Nature of religion; function and validity of religious concepts in the modern world. Cross listed as RLS 344. Prerequisite: 3 hours of religious studies or philosophy.

PHL 347 - Ethics (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
Major ethical theories as they provide insights into our existence as moral beings; how we exhibit this in moral decision and behavior.

PHL 350 - Art in Human Experience (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. FA
Detailed examination and explanation of various forms of visual, musical, literary, and dramatic arts; function of artistic creation in offering direct experience and appreciation of the essence of human feeling. Background in the arts recommended.

PHL 403 - Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours)
Advanced study of a particular thinker, system, work, or movement in philosophy. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. in philosophy, or consent of instructor.

PHL 404 - Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours)
Advanced study of a particular thinker, system, work, or movement in philosophy. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. in philosophy, or consent of instructor.

PHL 407 - American Political Thought (3 hours)
Systematic political thought in American philosophy from colonial times to the present. Cross listed as PLS 407. Prerequisite: PLS 207, or consent of instructor.

PHL 551 - Reading in Philosophy (1-3 hours)
Directed individual study. Prerequisites: 6 hours in philosophy; senior or graduate standing; consent of department chair.

PHL 552 - Reading in Philosophy (1-3 hours)
Directed individual study. Prerequisites: 6 hours in philosophy; senior or graduate standing; consent of department chair.

This is the official catalog for the 2010-2011 academic year. This catalog serves as a contract between a student and Bradley University. Should changes in a program of study become necessary prior to the next academic year every effort will be made to keep students advised of any such changes via the Dean of the College or Chair of the Department concerned, the Registrar's Office, u.Achieve degree audit system, and the Schedule of Classes. It is the responsibility of each student to be aware of the current program and graduation requirements for particular degree programs.