Coronavirus Information:
Bradley University will continue on-campus, in-person classes for the spring 2021 semester with limited restrictions.

Seminars

  • You may sign up for only ONE honors seminar per semester.
  • You will not be charged additional tuition or HON 100 if it causes you to have more than 16 hours.

Spring 2021 - HON 101

40 — Marketing (yo)U

  M 12-12:50 pm
  Prof. Brad Eskridge, Marketing Department

Welcome to Marketing University! A sort of play on this being a Marketing University for students to learn how to effectively market themselves (personal values, core competencies, personal branding, interviewing skills, professionalism, etc.) in the professional world. In this seminar, we will read a diverse collection of literary pieces, work through several hands-on exercises, and have rich class discussions all built around you effectively marketing yourself to the professional world. From defining your values, core competencies, and personal brand to building professionalism skills, interviewing techniques, and thought frameworks, the goal is to help you Market(yo)U!

42 — Exploring the Fourth Dimension

  TH 4-5:15 (10 weeks)
  Dr. Anthony Bedenikovic, Mathematics Department

The idea of a fourth dimension--of reality beyond what can be seen--has attracted thinkers from various fields throughout history. In this seminar, we will study references to the fourth dimension in the work of artists, mathematicians, philosophers, scientists, and others. In general, a different aspect of the fourth dimension will be explored at each meeting. While most studies will include a mathematical perspective, the goal of this seminar is to investigate diverse perspectives. All majors are welcome. To help further convey the nature of this seminar, a list of sample questions follows: Can we learn to visualize the fourth dimension? How is a 4-dimensional universe different from a 3-dimensional universe? Is the fourth dimension just time? How has the idea of higher dimensions influenced the work of visual artists and writers? How has it influenced current scientific theories?

43 – The Three Bs and Their Greatest Hits

  T 3:00-4:15
  Dr. Kyle Dzapo, Music Department

Renowned nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow famously declared Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms the “Three Bs of Classical Music.” The moniker has endured just as the music of these three composers has endured among the best-loved music of the last centuries. Join us as we explore the lives of these three artists and come to understand their greatest hits. Starting with three miniatures (a Bach Chorale, Für Elise, and Brahms’s Lullaby), we will then explore the three biggest hits of each of the Bs.

44 – #fakenews

  TH 3:00-4:15 (10 weeks)
  Dr. Sara Netzley, Communications Department

What is it? What isn’t it? Where does it come from? How can you guard against it? This seminar will explore concepts such as misinformation, propaganda, bias, and gaslighting using recent and historical examples, with an emphasis on the origin, spread, and implications of fake news for citizens, society, and democracy.

45 – King Leopold II and the Heart of Darkness

  W 12-12:50
  Dr. Ted Fleming, Biology Department

Antibiotic-resistant micro-organisms are occurring worldwide, endangering the usefulness of antibiotics that have transformed medicine and saved millions of lives. During this course, students will discuss the use of antibiotics, the origin and history of antibiotic resistance, efforts to address the problem, and possible alternatives to current antibiotic therapy. This course will include time in the microbiology lab during which students will work with bacteria, and potentially isolate antibiotic-resistant organisms. Students’ general knowledge and understanding of the topic will be demonstrated and evaluated by active participation and oral and written presentations.

46 – Antibiotics and the Advent of Antibiotic-Resistant Organisms

  W 12:00-12:50
  Dr. Ted Fleming, Biology Department

Virus infections that spread worldwide (pandemics) are of major significance to humanity. This course will present the biology of two important, well-studied viruses, the influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and will consider their impact with regard to human health, economic prosperity, and politics. The seminar will consist of a lecture-discussion format. Each student will be required to present two oral reports and write a topic paper on an aspect of the topic.

47 – Choosing Leadership

  W 3:00-4:15 (11 weeks)
  Prof. Valerie Pape, Management and Leadership Department

Leadership is a choice. You make the choice to lead on any given day. How do you make that choice? Choosing to lead requires that you ask some tough questions of yourself and use your life experience as data. That data can help you develop leadership skills now and establish habits that will support lifelong learning. The seminar will use Dr. Linda Ginzel’s book Choosing Leadership to guide you through writing your own earliest leadership story; defining leadership; understanding your “gist”; learning from the experience of others; learning from your own experience; being wiser, younger; and developing leadership skills every day. Rather than viewing leadership as a set of traits or a being in a formal position, we’ll discuss a number of ways that you can build your own path to effective leadership. We will learn through various methods including: reading, self-reflection, sharing stories, writing and virtual discussion.

48 – Science and Faith

  T 3-4:15 (10 weeks)
  Dr. Wayne Bosma, Chemistry Department

This seminar will explore the interrelationship between the rational methods of science and the beliefs of Judeo-Christian religious faith. When a scientist has religious beliefs, are these a help or a hindrance to his/her profession? What attitudes should a theistic nonscientist have toward science? These questions and others will be critically analyzed.

49 – The Surveillance State and Dystopian Science Fiction

  T 1:30-2:20 (all semester)
  Dr. Craig Curtis, Political Science Department

The growth of the surveillance capacity, and the ability of governments to use that capacity to exert control over their citizens, is a real phenomenon. This course will explore that phenomenon via three sets of activities. First, students will examine case studies from current events, reading news stories, and other online documents, concerning the ability of modern nations to exert control over those it finds potentially dangerous. These case studies will include the United States and other nations. Second, students will read two recently published novels in which a near future planet earth is governed in ways that are different because of the use of pervasive surveillance technology. Third, students will engage in a creative activity. Students may choose to write a short story (or short graphic novella) or a scholarly essay concerning the issues surrounding the growth of surveillance technology.

50 – Existential Action Movies

  TH 7-10 pm (10 weeks)
  Dr. John Williams, History Department

What would you do in order to survive in wartime? What if you had three chances to save your lover, and you failed the first two times? What if a maniacal tyrant were so cruel that you had to save your friends from him, even if it cost you your life? If you were in a Nazi prison awaiting execution and they unexpectedly put another prisoner in your cell with you, would you tell him your escape plan? You have six seconds to save the world, and time is moving forward for some people and backward for others--what to do? Find out how filmmakers have intertwined intense action and ethical dilemmas by reading about, watching, and discussing twelve movies. Our films will likely include “Aliens,” “The Matrix,” “Hero,” “The Hurt Locker,” “Warrior,” “Inception,” “Tenet,” “1917,” “Mad Max: Fury Road,” and “Black Panther.” Please note that some films will contain discomfiting philosophical, violent, or sexual content.

Fall 2021 - HON 100

NOTE:

  • You may sign up for only ONE honors seminar per semester.
  • You will not be charged additional tuition for HON 100 if it causes you to have more than 16 hours.

41 – Oral Communications for Real-Life Situations

  W 3-3:50

  Prof. Dakota Horn, Communications Department

Prerequisite: COM 103 or its equivalent.

This course is designed as an opportunity to research, organize, practice and present your ideas for several different types of speech situations in which you may find yourself throughout your professional and personal life. It is not designed to teach you the skills you should have gained in COM103 but rather a chance to use those basic skills to further create, practice, hone, personalize, and professionalize your own way as a speaker. Ideally, this course provides an advanced understanding of the public speaking experience as an orator in real-life contexts. One of the primary goals of this course is to connect public speaking to the workplace, where excellent public speaking skills are sought after in a competitive job market. As a result, the course emphasizes the interplay between compelling storytelling, audience analysis, skilled outlining and composing speeches, effective delivery and awareness of nonverbal components of a presentation in order to develop a personal speaking style. Learning how to make effective presentations outside of the classroom is the primary focus in this course.

42 – Practical Legal and Accounting Concepts

  TH 12-1:15 (10 weeks)
  Prof. Bill Bailey, Business Department

This seminar is open to all students interested in understanding key practical legal and accounting concepts including (1) the United States legal structure, (2) capital markets (e.g., stocks and bonds), (3) personal finance, and (3) the impact of taxation on individuals and businesses—including individual tax issues, the entrepreneur’s choice of business entity, and estate planning issues. Students of all majors are encouraged to participate and no prerequisites are required.

43 — Mozart: Portrait of Genius

  T 3-4:15 (10 weeks)
  Dr. Kyle Dzapo, Music Department

This seminar will introduce the extraordinary achievements of one of Western music’s greatest artists. Each of the class sessions will include discussion of significant events in a particular period of Mozart’s life and an introduction to one of the major compositions wri en during that time. Peter Gay’s Mozart will serve as our text, and we will watch Miloš Forman’s Amadeus as well. Students of all majors are encouraged to participate; no prior musical training is necessary.

44 – Why are we here?

  M 3-3:50
  Prof. Seth Katz, English Department

This course is offered to incoming freshmen only.

Through reading, writing, and conversation, we will approach different answers to this question, and a number of others, including but not limited to

  • “Why have you come to college?”
  • “What should be the relationship of college to career?”
  • “What does it mean to learn?”
  • “What happens when we die?"
  • “How do we know what’s true?"
  • “What do non-scientists need to understand about science?”
  • “Why do the arts matter?” 
  • “What is happiness?”

Assigned readings will include classic and contemporary texts, all available online.

45 – The Psychology of Social Media

  W 10-10:50
  Prof. Heidi Rottier, Marketing Department

Why do we use social media? What about social media keeps us coming back again and again?Around the globe, nearly half the world’s population turns to social media for information, social interaction, shopping advice, and so much more. Although you may use social media every day (2+ hours/day!), you may not be aware of the psychology behind it. This seminar will explore the reasons why social media keeps us coming back for more. We will also discuss the impact social media has on our mental health, relationships, and perception of the world around us.

46 – World Film Since 2010

  T 7-10pm
  Prof. John Williams, History Department

Some of the most provocative filmmaking of the early twenty-first century has addressed the declining faith in the established order, fears of the future, and intensifying desires to find ways of navigating the precarious new millennium. This seminar focuses on recent films that grapple with the instabilities of the 21st century in artistically innovative and politically provocative ways. Students need to enter with an open mind, an awareness of the expansive possibilities of cinematic art, and a willingness to read about, watch, and discuss the movies. Please be aware that several of the films contain provocative ideological, emotional, sexual, and/or violent content. Possible films may include Moonlight, Nomadland, Parasite, Palm Springs, Black Mirror: Nosedive, A Separation, Get Out, Weekend, The Great Beauty, Leave No Trace, The Babadook, Timbuktu, Never Rarely Sometimes Always, Sorry to Bother You, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, and Two Days, One Night.

47 – Japanese Pop Culture

  W 2-3:15 (10 weeks)

  Prof. Rustin Gates, History Department

This course examines Japanese popular culture in an effort to understand contemporary Japanese society, economy, and culture. Topics include manga (comic books), JPop (music), anime (Japanese animated films) and feature films, and the impact of the globalization of Japanese culture at home in Japan and abroad. Extensive consumption of various media will occur both inside and outside of the class meetings. Students will write short response papers and produce a final presentation.

48 – Jose Saramago's Blindness

  T 3-3:50

  Prof. Kevin Swafford, English Department

In the “Presentation Speech” for the 1998 Nobel Prize in Literature (awarded to Portuguese author, José Saramago), Professor Kjell Espmark states that “there is one type of writer who, like a bird of prey, circles time and again over the same territory. Book succeeds book, in progress towards a coherent picture of the world. José Saramago belongs to the opposite category, writers who repeatedly seem to want to invent both a world and a style that is new.” The a empt to arrive at something new that opens perspective and expands the horizons of knowing and thinking are at core of Saramago’s writing. In this seminar we will read and analyze Saramago’s award winning book, Blindness (1995) -- a novel of existential crisis, global pandemic, social chaos, hope and possibilities. For the course you will be expected to read Saramago’s novel, keep and post a reader response journal (400 words a week), actively participate in all class activities and discussions, and write a final critical essay (6 to 8 pages).

49 – Choosing Leadership

  T 12:00-1:15 (10 weeks) Online synchronous

  Prof. Valerie Pape, Management and Leadership Department

Leadership is a choice. You make the choice to lead on any given day. How do you make that choice? Choosing to lead requires that you ask some tough questions of yourself and use your life experience as data. That data can help you develop leadership skills now and establish habits that will support lifelong learning. The seminar will use Dr. Linda Ginzel’s book Choosing Leadership to guide you through writing your own earliest leadership story; defining leadership; understanding your “gist”; learning from the experience of others; learning from your own experience; being wiser, younger; and developing leadership skills every day. Rather than viewing leadership as a set of traits or a being in a formal position, we’ll discuss a number of ways that you can build your own path to effective leadership. We will learn through various methods including: reading, self-reflection, sharing stories, writing and virtual discussion.