Course Descriptions

SOC 100 - The Sociological Perspective (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Core Curr. SB
Sociological insight into study of humans, society, and culture.

SOC 200 - Sociology Proseminar (1 hour)
Overview of the discipline of sociology. Focus on specializations within the field, possible career paths, and options for graduate study. Introduction to discipline-specific research and writing skills. Discussion of faculty members' ongoing research activities. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Major in sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 205 - Immigration: People, Place and Power (3 hours)
Core Curr. MI,SB
This course examines the origins and outcomes of international immigration. Using perspectives and evidence from the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the humanities, we consider issues including the complex social and environmental factors that drive immigration; state, popular and media responses to immigration; and the effects of immigration, both for immigrants and for the nations they leave and enter. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

SOC 210 - Sociology of Families (3 hours)
Examination of the notion of the U.S. American family from a sociological perspective. Focus on perceptions of the family throughout U.S. American history, in mass media, and in relation to public policy; the historical transformation of families; the diverse and changing aspects of families; and the impact of social change and problems on the families of U.S.A. Emphasis on how society and the economic system affect families. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 211 - Contemporary Social Problems (3 hours)
Sociological analysis of current social problems in the U.S.: poverty, racism, sexism, agism, medical care, the environment, population, urban disorganization, crime, juvenile delinquency, alcoholism, drug addiction, family disorganization, and mental illness. Use of different perspectives promotes a broad understanding of the study of social problems. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 212 - Sociology of Diversity (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. CD
Analyzes nature, forms, and problems of social "diversity" with emphasis on patterns of difference and commonality, advantage, and disadvantage in the area of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and physical disability. A particular focus will be on ways inequalities in wealth, education, employment, health, the criminal justice system, popular culture, and the political process are reproduced and challenged in contemporary societies.

SOC 240 - Research Methods (3 hours)
Social research methods: research design and models of observation, including single subject and program evaluation, quantitative and qualitative methods, sampling techniques, questionnaire construction, types of surveys, measurement problems, and data analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 300 - Cross-Cultural Perspectives On Gender (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Core Curr. GP WC
Examines the construction of gender in non-western societies, concentrating on the way gender shapes and is shaped by power relations in these societies. Prerequisite: SOC 100, ANT 101, or consent of instructor.

SOC 311 - Comparative Family Systems (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. NW
Core Curr. GP WC
Comparative study of non-Western family systems, with a focus on cross-cultural differences and the potential conflicts of migration. Varying focus on families of Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Prerequisite: SOC 100, ANT 101, or consent of instructor.

SOC 312 - Social Inequality (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Core Curr. SB
Inequality in income, wealth, prestige, and power. Theories explaining roots of and changes in inequality. Emphasis on the U.S.; variations in the extent and forms of inequality across different nations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 313 - Race, Ethnicity, and Power (3 hours)
Core Curr. WI,SB
Analysis of dominant-minority group relations. The emergence and dynamic of racism. Exploration of the experience of various ethnic and "racial" groups. Prerequisite: SOC 100, SOC 212 or consent of instructor

SOC 315 - Gender and Society (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Core Curr. SB
An examination of gender as a system of stratification, as a social construction, and as a system of meaning which changes trans-historically and differs cross-culturally. Focus on structural and interactional aspects of gender inequality, as well as the relationship between gender and other social hierarchies, including class, race, ethnicity, religion, and sexuality. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or instructor consent.

SOC 316 - Sociology of Work and Occupations (3 hours)
The organization of work, occupational processes, and experiences of workers with a focus on the manufacturing industry and the impact of technology on the structure of work; the rise of the service sector; the emergence of temporary and contract work; professions and professionalization; workplace inequality; and the intersection of gender, family, and work. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 320 - Social Theory (3 hours)
Development of contemporary social thought from its Euro- American roots. Covers major strands of both classic and contemporary social theory. Prerequisite: SOC Major, SOC Minor, or consent of Instructor.

SOC 321 - Individual and Society (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
Various philosophical conceptions of the relationship between the individual and social order; nature and status of individuality in the modern world. Emphasis on critical evaluation of influential systems of thought: Marxism, phenomenology, and critical theory. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

SOC 322 - Self and Social Interaction (3 hours)
Focus on relationship between individuals and the broader society, the formation of personality, and group influences on human perception and behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or instructor consent.

SOC 325 - Environmental Sociology (3 hours)
Core Curr. SB
This course introduces students to the social causes and consequences of environmental problems and the conflicting interests and power dynamics that make sustainable solutions difficult to find and implement. The course begins by examining a range of philosophical perspectives on the relationship between Humans and Nature, followed by a brief survey of the range and extent of current environmental crises. We will then focus on four macro-sociological causes of environmental harm worldwide: international development, modern agriculture, armed violence, and energy production. Special attention will be paid to the linkages between environmental harm and political and economic inequality.

SOC 326 - Sociology of Globalization (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. SF
Analysis of the process of global integration and its impact on communities, social institutions, and culture. Emphasis on theories of social change and social conflict over the nature and pace of globalization and its impact on non-Western societies. Focus on social class, ethnicity, gender, media, religion, the environment, and social problems confronting non-Western Societies. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 330 - Perspectives On Deviance (3 hours)
Analysis of the concept and nature of deviance and its various forms, with emphasis on various theoretical perspectives on nature and causation of deviance. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 331 - Correctional Policies and Society (3 hours)
Analysis of theoretical and practical aspects of corrections, concepts of punishment and treatment, and their variations in practice. Includes analysis and evaluation of specific alternatives: prisons, probation, treatment centers, and sentencing. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 332 - Juvenile Delinquency (3 hours)
Analysis of the nature and origin of juvenile delinquency within an historical and theoretical context with emphasis on causation of delinquency and evaluation of different responses to it. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 333 - Sociology of Violence (3 hours)
Sociological analysis of the concept and nature of violence in a macro and micro setting, its various manifestations, and evaluation of responses to it. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 334 - Crime and Society (3 hours)
Analysis of the concept and nature of crime, the relationship between social structures, social institutions, and crime with a focus on social forces and social controls involved in the creation of crime. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 341 - Medical Sociology (3 hours)
Application of a critical perspective to the institution of medicine. Focus on epidemiology, the social construction of illness, and current healthcare trends. Prerequisite: SOC 100, ANT 101, or consent of instructor.

SOC 342 - Social Policy (3 hours)
Focuses on the major institutions of social structure, such as education, family, government, healthcare, work, and the legal system. Investigates why social policies are developed, how social policy is implemented, and the direct and indirect effects of policy. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 343 - Sociology of Mental Health (3 hours)
Emphasis on social, cultural, and political factors involved in the definition and control of mental illness. Topics include labeling theory, the impact of status characteristics and social relationships on levels of stress, and legal and ethical issues associated with current modes of treatment. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 344 - Social Movements (3 hours)
In some contexts, social movements have been considered legitimate political actors; in others, treacherous and subversive. Always they constitute a potential threat to those in power. When do movements emerge and how are they organized? How and when can they successfully bring about social change? We will examine key aspects of social movement theory and practice against the backdrop of a number of important American and international movements that have emerged in the last half century, such as the American civil rights, women's, environmental, and anti-war movements of the 1960s and 70s, the current "Fight for 15" and Black Lives Matter movements, and the global justice, autonomist, and Occupy movements internationally. Prerequisite:

SOC 345 - People, Power, and Politics (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to major themes, concepts, and debates in political sociology. Focus is on the relations of power between the State and other collective actors in society (e.g. interest groups, political parties, social classes, and social movements), with an emphasis on key axes of contention in US politics today, such as: the political power of corporations; the separation of church and state; political parties, polarization, and congressional gridlock; the trade-off between liberty and equality in free market, socialist, and social democratic systems; taxation and the role of the State in addressing social inequality; and the tension between national security and civil/human rights. Prerequisite:

SOC 346 - Sociology of Education (3 hours)
Focus on the institution of education and its relationship to the broader society within which it is situated. Emphasis on the ways in which schools reproduce and challenge prevailing economic, social and political relationships; the link between schools and societal stratification; and sociological perspectives on contemporary educational reform. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 390 - Topics in Sociology (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for maximum of 9 hrs. credit. Prerequisite: SOC 100, SOC 101, or consent of instructor.

SOC 391 - Internship in Applied Sociology (3 hours)
Supervised work in applied settings; study of practical problems from the perspective of the discipline. Prerequisite: Prior arrangement, consent of Department Chair. SOC 391 is prerequisite for SOC 392.

SOC 392 - Internship in Applied Sociology (3 hours)
Supervised work in applied settings; study of practical problems from the perspective of the discipline. Prerequisite: Prior arrangement, consent of Department Chair. SOC 391 is prerequisite for SOC 392.

SOC 420 - Critical Theory (3 hours)
Gen. Ed. HP
Introduction to influential social theorists affiliated with the Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt, Germany. Emphasis on their critique of social and cultural forms of domination in Western democracies, the question of revolutionary agency, and possibilities for emancipatory social change. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or consent of instructor.

SOC 450 - Senior Seminar in Sociology (3 hours)
Students will have the opportunity to synthesize and integrate perspectives from their sociology courses and apply these perspectives to real-world social problems. Prerequisite: Major in sociology, senior standing or consent of instructor.

SOC 490 - Directed Readings (1-3 hours)
Special study on topics with faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

SOC 491 - Directed Research I (1-3 hours)
Empirical research with faculty supervision. Prerequisite: 3.5 GPA in Sociology and consent of instructor.

SOC 492 - Directed Research II (1-3 hours)
Extended individual research with faculty supervision. Prerequisite: 3.5 GPA in Sociology and consent of instructor.

Criminology Studies Course Descriptions

CRM 110 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3 hours)
An introduction to the criminal justice systems in America, including policy making, law enforcement, prosecution, adjudication, and corrections. In addition to the institutions of the various systems, the major theoretical perspectives for explaining deviance and the societal response to deviance will be explored.

CRM 130 - Introduction to Investigations (3 hours)
An exploration of the principles of criminal investigation, including crime scene analysis, collection and analysis of physical evidence, the use of physical evidence in prosecution of crime, and the rules governing the introduction of physical evidence in court. Social and political issues affecting criminal investigations will also be covered.

CRM 225 - Criminal Law (3 hours)
An analysis of the history and development of the criminal law as a system of social control. Coverage includes the scope, purposes, and general principles of the criminal law as well as the elements of specific crimes. Prerequisite: CRM 110 OR CJS 110

CRM 230 - Introduction to Computer Forensics (3 hours)
Provides an overview of computer forensics, investigation techniques, and relevant laws. Covers computer operating system architectures and disk structures and their relevance to computer forensics. Cross listed as CIS 230. Prerequisite: Previous computer class or consent of instructor

CRM 250 - Police Organization and Administration (3 hours)
An introduction to the principles of organization and management of law enforcement bureaucracies, with an emphasis on the tasks faced by managers and the guiding principles used to complete these tasks. Students will consider the unique problems of managing a police bureaucracy in a democratic society. Prerequisite: CJS 110 OR ACJ 110

CRM 301 - Theories of Crime and Justice (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide an introductory survey of theories of crime, law, and justice. Students will be introduced to the importance of theory in criminology and criminal justice, the philosophical foundations of criminological theory, historical developments in the field, as well as contemporary trends and issues. Prerequisite: CJS 110 OR ACJ 110; junior or senior status; or consent of instructor

CRM 330 - Advanced Computer Forensics (3 hours)
Provides students an extensive look at computer forensics and formal techniques used in computer forensics in a lab environment. Formal techniques for conducting a computer forensics investigation including record-keeping are covered. Students will conduct computer forensic exams and participate in practical computer forensic examination exercises. Cross listed as CIS 330. Prerequisite: CIS 230 or CJS 230

CRM 360 - Drugs and Crime (3 hours)
Introduction to and overview of legal and illegal drugs, their use and abuse, and connection to crime and criminal justice. Particular attention is given to basic drug pharmacology, theories of drug use, the link between drugs and violence, the drug industry and law and policy pertaining to the control of drugs and drug use. Prerequisite: CJS 110 OR ACJ 110; or consent of instructor

CRM 380 - Topics in Crime, Law, and Justice (3 hours)
This course challenges students to critically explore the empirical, theoretical, and/or applied elements of special topics and key issues within the study of crime, law, and justice. This course may be repeated under different topic for a maximum of 6 semester hours. Prerequisite: CJS 110 OR ACJ 110; junior or senior status; or consent of instructor

CRM 401 - Ethics, Crime, and Criminal Justice (3 hours)
This course is designed to familiarize students with key theories, concepts, and principles in criminal justice ethics, their relevance for moral reasoning and decision-making, and their importance and practical value in everyday and professional contexts. Through this course students will be introduced to and asked to critically examine the relationship between ethics, crime, and criminal justice, several key challenges to ethical behavior, the ways in which morality has and does impact law and criminal justice policy, major models of ethical decision-making, and key variations of unethical behavior within police, courts, and corrections. Prerequisite: CRM 110 OR CJS 110; junior or senior status; or consent of instructor

CRM 480 - Directed Readings in Crime, Law, and Justice (1-3 hours)
Student-initiated, individualized readings and/or research to facilitate exploration or understanding of a criminological or criminal justice topic not sufficiently covered by or beyond the scope of formally developed coursework within the department. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of credit. Prerequisite: CRM 110 OR CJS 110; junior or senior status; or consent of instructor

S W 250 - Introduction to Social Welfare (3 hours)
Overview of historical development and contemporary forces shaping the social welfare system in the U.S. Examines social policies, social conditions affecting vulnerable populations, and service delivery systems in which social work is practiced. Includes community agency contact.

S W 260 - Research Methods (3 hours)
Social research methods: research design and models of observation, including single subject and program evaluation, quantitative and qualitative methods, sampling techniques, questionnaire construction, types of surveys, measurement problems, and data analysis. Prerequisite: Sociology or social work major or consent of instructor; MTH 111 or PSY 205.

S W 310 - Child Welfare I (3 hours)
Examines the theory and knowledge associated with practice in the field of child welfare. This course covers the areas of policy, normative child development, disruptions in child development, and the continuum of services for children in society.

S W 350 - Foundations for Social Work Practice (3 hours)
Historical development of social work. Introduction of generalist social work practice; systems perspective; knowledge, skills, values, and ethics required for practice; communication skills and the helping relationship as foundation for the problem-solving process. Overview of fields of practice. Includes required volunteer experience. Prerequisite: S W 250.

S W 351 - Social Work Practice I (3 hours)
Assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, termination, and follow-up phases of the problem-solving process. Students develop interviewing skills and apply knowledge of social systems, human development, diversity, and ethics with focus on the micro level. Prerequisite: S W 350, social work major or consent of social work program director.

S W 352 - Social Work Practice II (3 hours)
Generalist practice with focus on families and groups as well as individuals in group contexts. Includes required volunteer experience in group setting. Prerequisite: S W 350; social work major or consent of social work program director.

S W 353 - Social Work Practice III (3 hours)
Generalist practice with focus on organizations, communities, and large social systems. Assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation skills for macro-level practice. Emphasis on issues of diversity, discrimination, and oppression. Prerequisite: S W 350; social work major or consent of social work program director.

S W 354 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (3 hours)
Current research and theory concerning interaction of environment with individual behavior. Life span development, strengths, approach, and issues of diversity as influences on individual development.

S W 355 - Social Welfare Policy (3 hours)
Analysis of social welfare policy from the social work perspective. Impact of social policy on recipients and constituents of social welfare programs. Institutional responses to social problems, social justice, and human needs. Analysis and evaluation of policy at the organizational, community, and legislative levels. Prerequisite: ECO 100; PLS 105; S W 250.

S W 356 - Topics in SW (3 hours)
Topics of special interest which may vary each time the course is offered. Topic stated in current Schedule of Classes. May be repeated under a different topic for maximum of 6 hours credit.

S W 358 - Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (3 hours)
Current research and theory concerning interaction of environment with families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social and cultural causes and impact of diversity, discrimination, and oppression. Prerequisite: S W 354.

S W 393 - Social Work Practicum (9 hours)
Supervised experience in an approved community agency; use of knowledge and skills common to generalist practice; 420 field hours required. Pass/fail. Prerequisite: S W 351; social work major. Corequisite: S W 395.

S W 395 - Social Work Seminar (3 hours)
Core Curr. WI
Seminar that integrates theory and principles learned in academic courses with field and practice experience. Prerequisite: S W 351; social work major. Corequisite: S W 393.

S W 490 - Individual Study in Social Work (1-3 hours)
Special study on topics with faculty supervision. For social work majors; non-majors require approval of Department Chair. May be repeated under a different topic up to a maximum of 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of director of social work program.

S W 499 - Honors Colloquium (3 hours)
Special study or project conducted under faculty supervision. Oral presentation before a faculty committee. Prerequisite: 3.5 GPA in social work major and consent of department chair.