Concentration in Biomedical Science Research & Development

The biomedical science concentration in research and development prepares you to be an innovator in the medical world.

Preparing You for Success

The degree introduces you to research with an emphasis on problem solving and the scientific process. It’s a research-focused degree with lab experiences starting your freshman year. Classes introduce you to research methods your freshman year, then you can build on those through labs, independent studies and summer research. In addition, you learn chemistry, sociology and psychology concepts valuable to your professional interests.

By the time you graduate, your experiences may include:

  • One-on-one mentorship from faculty
  • Opportunities to publish your research or share it at professional conferences
  • A senior research capstone project
  • Opportunities for networking and professional development through Tri-Beta national honor society and the Biology Undergraduate Society

Making Your Mark

A research and development degree is valuable in a rapidly changing world in which researchers are developing solutions to the most pressing challenges. You can continue to graduate school or directly pursue a career in which you design, develop and test new medicines or products.

Concentration Requirements

The research and development concentration requires completion of the undergraduate biomedical science major plus the following.

Required Courses - 6 hrs.

  • BIO 485: Research - 6 hrs.

Note: A year long research project is required.

Elective Courses (choose two) - 6-8 hrs.

  • BIO 406: General Microbiology - 4 hrs.
  • BIO 464: Cell Biology - 3-4 hrs.
  • BIO 505: Topics in Bioethics - 3 hrs.
  • BIO 509: Human Genetics - 3 hrs.
  • CHM 360: Biochemistry - 3 hrs.

Recommended Elective Courses

  • ENT 381: Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Students - 3 hrs.
  • ECO 100: Introduction to Economics – 3 hrs
    or ECO 221: Principles of Microeconomics - 3 hrs.

Note: The courses used for the concentration cannot have been used to fulfill the requirements for the major.