Sociology

Sociology is the systematic study of social behavior, social systems, and social change. This major gives you the tools you need to interpret and respond effectively to all kinds of social situations and prepares you for a wide variety of careers.

Preparing You For Success

As a sociology major, you can learn about every aspect of social life, from inequality, culture, crime, and politics to gender, the family, race and social movements. You will develop strong critical thinking skills, as you learn how to use scientific methodology to collect and analyze data and make evidence-based arguments about the causes and consequences of social problems and what it would take to solve them. These skills will give you a solid foundation for graduate school, law school or the career of your choice. You can also pair sociology with another major or minor, such as criminology, political science, history, psychology, social work or business.

By the time you graduate, your experiences may include:

  • Research with faculty and classmates
  • Networking and career development through the Sociology Club and the Alpha Kappa Delta and Pi Gamma Mu honor societies
  • Internships in the court system, legal and social service agencies, or local businesses
  • Organizing campus events such as speakers, film screenings and panel discussions on topics of your choice

Making Your Mark

Sociology majors are equipped for a wide range of careers, from business, law, and social services to nonprofit and government work. A recent national study found that those who major in sociology earn more than any other undergraduate major except computer science and visual art! Recent sociology graduates are working as judges, adoption agency case managers, training coordinators, researchers, workforce management strategists, human resources systems analysts, and public health experts. Others are attending graduate school at places like the University of Illinois - Chicago, the University of Michigan, Kent State University, the University of Maryland, and the University of Missouri.

Major Requirements

Required Courses - 12 hrs.

  • SOC 100: The Sociological Perspective - 3 hrs.
  • SOC 240: Research Methods - 3 hrs.
  • SOC 320: Social Theory - 3 hrs.
    or SOC 420: Critical Theory - 3 hrs.
  • SOC 450: Capstone Seminar in Sociology - 3 hrs.

Elective Courses - 18 hrs.

Students must choose one of the three focus areas listed below and take at least two of their six elective courses within that area, one of which must be at or above the 300 level. To ensure a breadth of knowledge in the field, they must also complete at least one course from each of the other two focus areas.

  • Health and Social Services
    • SOC 210: Sociology of Families - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 211: Social Problems: 3 hrs.
    • SOC 212: Sociology of Diversity - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 316: Sociology of Work and Occupations - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 330: Perspectives on Deviance - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 331: Correctional Policies and Society - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 332: Juvenile Delinquency - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 341: Medical Sociology - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 342: Social Policy - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 343: Sociology of Mental Health - 3 hrs.
  • Inequality and Social Justice
    • SOC 312: Social Inequality - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 313: Race, Ethnicity, and Power - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 315: Gender and Society - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 321: Individual and Society - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 322: Self and Social Interaction - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 333: Sociology of Violence - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 334: Crime and Society - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 344: Social Movements - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 345: People, Power & Politics - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 346: Sociology of Education - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 420: Critical Theory - 3 hrs.
  • Global Studies
    • ANT 303: Culture & Belief: Magic, Witchcraft, Religion - 3 hrs.
    • ANT 305: Peoples and Cultures of the World - 3 hrs.
    • ANT 306: Illness and Healing in Cross-Cultural Perspective - 3 hrs.
    • ANT 314: Native Americans - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 300: Cross-Cultural Perspectives On Gender - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 311: Comparative Family Systems - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 325: Environmental Sociology - 3 hrs.
    • SOC 326: Sociology of Globalization - 3 hrs.

The following courses may also be counted as electives, with the focus area to be designated by the professor:

  • SOC 390: Topics in Sociology - 3 hrs.
  • SOC 391: Internship in Applied Sociology - 3 hrs.
  • SOC 490: Directed Readings - 1-3 hrs.
  • SOC 491: Directed Research I - 1-3 hrs.
  • ANT 402: Ethnographic and Qualitative Methods - 3 hrs.

In their final year, students will develop and complete a Capstone Seminar project within their chosen focus area.